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Full text of "Vacation travel by Canadians in the United States / conducted by Traveldata International"

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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 

United States Travel Service 

Office of Research and Analysis 













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A study of Canadian vacation patterns: 

Characteristics of travelers and trips to each 

of the nine regions of the U.S. 



■ 



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as well as to the U.S. as a whole. 



Conducted by 
Traveldata in 1975 

Sponsored by 
the United States Travel Service, 



-■■ 



the Canadian Government Office of Tourism, 

the Ministry of Transport (Canada) 

the Quebec Ministere Du Tourisme 
de la Chasse Et de la Peche 

and 
the Montreal Star, Ltd. 

October 1975 















'^6-l9l 6 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office 

Washington, D.C. 20402 - Price $1.90 

Stock Number 003-012-00036-1 



Table of Contents 

Page 

SECTION I. -HIGHLIGHTS OF CANADIAN VACATION TRAVEL IN 1974 1 

I. Introduction 1 

II. Methodology 1 

III. Highlights of the Findings 2 

A. Total Canadian Vacation Travel in 1 974 2 

B. Canadian Vacation Travel to the U.S. in 1974 2 

C. Summary of Characteristics of Canadian Vacation Travel 

to the U.S. in 1974 5 

SECTION II. - DETAILED FINDINGS OF CANADIAN VACATION TRAVEL IN 1974 . . 6 

I. Canadian Vacations and Trips 6 

A. Frequency of Canadian Vacation Travel 7 

B. Destination of Canadian Vacation Travelers 7 

C. Canadian Vacation Expenditures 9 

1. Per Capita Expenditures 10 

2. Profile of the Canadian Vacation Traveler to the U.S. 

With Above Average Vacation Expenditures; 1974 10 

3. Daily Per Capita Expenditures 12 

II. Traveler Characteristics 12 

A. Residence of Canadian Vacationers 13 

B. Urban/Rural Residence 15 

C. Language Spoken 15 

D. Dwelling Ownership 16 

E. Type of Dwelling Inhabited 16 

F. Sex 17 

G. Age 17 

H. Marital Status 18 

I. Education 18 

J. Occupation of Head of Household 19 

K. Family Income 20 

L. Family Composition 21 

III. Trip Characteristics 22 

A. Purpose of Trip 22 

B. Total Number of Adults in Party 23 

C. Mode of Transportation 24 

D. Seasonality 25 

E. Length of Stay 27 

IV. Attitudes Toward Travel in the U.S 28 



in 



TABLE OF CONTENTS-Continued 

Page 

TECHNICAL INDEX 31 

APPENDICES 37 

Section I. - Canadian Vacations and Trips 39 

Section II. - Traveler Characteristics 61 

Section III. — Trip Characteristics 81 



LIST OF CHARTS 



Chart 


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2 


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4 


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Chart 1 1 


Chart 1 2 


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13 


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14 


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15 


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Chart 17 


Chart 18 


Chart 19 


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20 


Chart 21 


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22 


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23 


Chart 24 


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25 


Chart 26 



Canadian Vacation and Vacation Trips 1966-74 6 

Number of Vacation Trips Taken by Canadians Each Year 1966-74 7 

Destinations of Canadian Travelers (International and Domestic) 7 

Canadian Vacation Arrivals and Expenditures in the U.S 8 

Canadian Vacation Arrivals and Expenditures in the U.S., 1974 11 

Canadian Vacation Trips to the U.S. in 1974 by Destination of Air Visitors ... 12 

Canadian Vacation Trips to the U.S. in 1974 by Destination of Auto Visitors . . 12 

Canadian Vacation Travelers to the U.S. in 1974 by Residence 13 

Canadian Vacation Trips to the U.S. in 1974 by Size of City of Residence .... 14 



Canadian Vacation Travelers to the U.S. in 
Canadian Vacation Travelers to the U.S. in 
Canadian Vacation Travelers to the U.S. in 
Canadian Vacation Travelers to the U.S. in 
Canadian Vacation Travelers to the U.S. in 
Canadian Vacation Travelers to the U.S. in 
Canadian Vacation Travelers to the U.S. in 
Canadian Vacation Travelers to the U.S. in 
Canadian Vacation Travelers to the U.S. in 
By Occupation of Head of Household . . 
Canadian Vacation Travelers to the U.S. in 
Canadian Vacation Travelers to the U.S. in 
Canadian Vacation Trips to the U.S. in 1974 
Canadian Vacation Trips to the U.S. in 1974 
Canadian Vacation Trips to the U.S. in 1974 
Canadian Vacation Trips to the U.S. in 1974 
Canadian Vacation Trips to the U.S. in 1974 
Canadian Vacation Trips to the U.S. in 1 974 



974 by Urban/Rural Residence 

974 

974 

974 

974 



. . 15 

By Language Spoken .... 15 

By Dwelling Ownership ... 16 

By Type of Dwelling .... 16 

By Sex 17 



974 
974 
974 
974 



By Age 17 

By Marital Status 18 

By Education 19 



20 



1974 - By Family Income 21 

1974 — By Family Composition ... 22 

By Purpose of Trips 23 

By Main Mode of Transport ... 24 

By Seasonality (Quarterly) ... 25 

By Seasonality (By Period) ... 25 

By Seasonality (By Month) ... 26 

By Length of Stay 27 



LIST OF TABLES 

Table 1. - Canadian Vacation Arrivals and Expenditures in the U.S., 1974 9 

Table 2. - Attitudes Toward Travel in the U.S. vs. Canada, 1973-1974 28 

Table 3. — Favorable Attitudes Towards Travel in the U.S. vs. Canada, 1974 29 



IV 



TABLE OF CONTENTS-Continued 

APPENDICES 

SECTION I. - CANADIAN VACATIONS AND TRIPS 

Page 

I-A. Canadian Vacation Patterns, 1966-74 41 

I-B. Characteristics of Canadians Who Take Vacation Trips 42 

I-C. Vacation Travel Projections 43 

I-D. Destinations of Canadian Vacation Travelers, 1966-74 44 

I-E. Destinations of Canadian Travelers by Place of Residence, 1973-74 45 

I-F. Canadian Vacation Arrivals and Expenditures in the U.S., by Characteristics 

of the Travelers 1973-74 46 

I-G. Canadian Vacation Travel to Multiple Regions in U.S., in 1974 54 

I-H. Projected Expenditures 56 

I-I. Canadian Vacation Party Expenditures 57 

I-J. Canadian Vacation Travel to the U.S. in 1974 58 

I-K. Canadian Vacation Travel to the U.S. in 1974 (By place of Residence of 

Auto Visitors) 59 

SECTION II. - TRAVELER CHARACTERISTICS 

II-A. Canadian Vacation Travel to the U.S. in 1974 by Place of Residence 63 

II-B. Destinations of Canadian Vacation Travelers by City of Residence 64 

II-C. Canadian Vacation Travel to the U.S. in 1974 (City of Residence) 65 

II-D. Canadian Vacation Trips to the U.S. by Destination (1974) 66 

II-E. Canadian Vacation Travel to the U.S. in 1974 (By Size of City of Residence) .... 67 

1I-F. Canadian Vacation Travel to the U.S. in 1974 (By Urban/Rural Residence) 68 

II-G. Canadian Vacation Travel to the U.S. in 1974 (By Language Spoken) 69 

II-H. Canadian Vacation Travel to the U.S. in 1974 (By Dwelling Ownership) 70 

II-I. Canadian Vacation Travel to the U.S. in 1974 (By Type of Dwelling Occupied) ... 71 

II-J. Canadian Vacation Travel to the U.S. in 1974 (By Sex) 72 

II-K. Canadian Vacation Travel to the U.S. in 1974 (By Age) 73 

II-L. Canadian Vacation Travel to the U.S. in 1974 (By Marital Status) 74 

II-M. Canadian Vacation Travel to the U.S. in 1974 (By Education) 75 

II-N. Canadian Vacation Travel to the U.S. in 1974 (By Occupation of 

Head of House) 76 

II-O. Canadian Vacation Travel to the U.S. in 1974 (By Family Income) 77 

II-P. Canadian Vacation Travel to the U.S. in 1974 (By Socio-Economic Level) 78 

II-Q. Canadian Vacation Travel to the U.S. in 1974 (By Family Composition) 79 

II-R. Canadian Vacation Travel to the U.S. in 1974 (By Number of Adults from 

Own Household) 80 



TABLE OF CONTENTS-Continued 



SECTION III. - TRIP CHARACTERISTICS 

Page 

III-A. Canadian Vacation Trips to the U.S. in 1974 (By Purpose of Trip) 83 

III-B. Total Canadian Vacation Travel, By Main Purpose of Trip, 1967-74 85 

III-C. Canadian Vacation Travel to the U.S. in 1974 (By Purpose of Trip, Nights 

Spent in the U.S. and Month Trip Started) 86 

III-D. Canadian Vacation Travel to the U.S. in 1974 (By Purpose of Trip, Nights 

Spent in the U.S. and Month Trip Started 87 

III-E. Canadian Vacation Travel to the U.S. in 1974 (By Total Adults in Party) 88 

III-F. Total Canadian Vacation Travel (By Main Mode of Transport), 1966-74 89 

III-G. Canadian Vacation Trips to the U.S. in 1974 (By Main Mode of Transport) 90 

III-H. Characteristics of Canadian Vacation Air Travelers 91 

HIT. Canadian Vacation Trips to the U.S. in 1974 (By Main Mode of Transport 

and Month Trip Started) 93 

III-J. Canadian Vacation Trips to the U.S. in 1974, (By Main Mode of Transport, 

Nights Spent in the U.S., and Month Trip Started) 93 

IH-K. Total Canadian Vacation Travel, by Month Trip Started, 1966-74 94 

IH-L Canadian Vacation Trips to the U.S. in 1974 By Seasonality of 

Trip (Quarterly) 95 

HI-M. Canadian Vacation Trips to the U.S. in 1974 By Seasonality of 

Trip (Quarterly) 96 

III-N. Canadian Vacation Trips to the U.S. in 1974 By Seasonality of 

Trip (Monthly) 97 

III-O. Canadian Vacation Trips, by Length of Stay and Areas Visited 98 

III-P. Total Canadian Vacation Travel, by Length of Trip and Residence at 

Time of Trip, 1966-74 98 

III-Q. Canadian Vacation Trips to the U.S. in 1974 (By Length of Stay) 99 

III-R. Canadian Vacation Trips to the U.S. in 1974 (By Length of Stay) 100 



VI 



SECTION I 



HIGHLIGHTS OF CANADIAN VACATION TRAVEL 

IN 1974 



I. INTRODUCTION 

This report provides an analysis of a survey 
entitled Vacation Travel by Canadians in 1974. 
The survey was conducted by Traveldata for 
both the U.S. and Canada. Specifically, sponsors 
of the 1974 survey were: (1) The United States 
Travel Service; (2) Canadian Goverment Office 
of Tourism; (3) Ministry of Transport; (4) 
Quebec Ministere Du Tourism, De La Chasse Et 
De La Peche; and (5) the Montreal Star, Ltd. 

This survey represents the ninth in a series of 
annual studies describing Canadian holidays, 
vacation trips, habits and characteristics of the 
travelers. In addition the analysis incorporates 
some of the findings from the prior studies to 
facilitate trend analysis during the 1966-74 
period. 

The report contains 10 volumes. Volume 
1— Summary Report—provides information on 
Canadian travel to the United States as a whole. 
The remaining nine volumes highlight Canadian 
travel to the entire United States and provide 
detailed information on Canadian travel to 
various U.S. regions. 

Volume 1: Summary Report United States. 

Volume 2: New England -Connecticut, 
Maine, Massachusetts, New Hamp- 
shire, Rhode Island, Vermont. 

Volume 3: Eastern Gateway — New Jersey, 
New York. 

Volume 4: George Washington Country— Del- 
aware, District of Columbia, Mary- 
land, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West 
Virginia. 



Volume 5: The South-Alabama, Arkansas, 
Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Lou- 
isiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, 
South Carolina, Tennessee. 

Volume 6: Great Lakes Country Illinois, In- 
diana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, 
Ohio, Wisconsin. 

Volume 7: Old West-Colorado, Montana, Ne- 
braska, North Dakota, South Da- 
kota, Utah, Wyoming. 

Volume 8: Frontier West— Arizona, Kansas, 
Missouri, New Mexico, Oklahoma, 
Texas. 

Volume 9: Far West-Alaska, California, 
Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, Washing- 
ton. 

Volume 10: The Islands— American Samoa, 
Guam, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, Vir- 
gin Islands. 



II. METHODOLOGY 

This survey was based on a national probability 
sample involving 6,388 personal interviews with 
individuals 18 years old and over. The 1974 
survey includes data on Canadian travel to the 
U.S. Islands (American Samoa, Guam, Hawaii, 
Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands) in the 
figures on Canadian travel to the United States. 
In previous surveys, the United States category 
only included data on Canadian travel to the 
U.S. mainland. For trend analysis purposes, the 
1974 survey also includes information on Cana- 
dian travel to the entire U.S. Mainland. 



Limitations. In some instances, the size of the 
sample used to determine the characteristics of 
Canadian travelers to various regions or states is 
small. Interpretation of data based on these 
small sample sizes should, therefore, be made 
with caution. 



III. HIGHLIGHTS OF THE FINDINGS 



A. Total Canadian Travel in 1974 

• In spite of the fuel shortages and higher 
prices, the proportion of Canadians taking 
vacation trips in 1974 remained fairly con- 
stant, with the 1973 level. Specifically, in 
1974 55% of all adult Canadians took a 
vacation in 1974, compared to the 56% who 
did so in 1973. 

• There was a curtailment of second and third 
trips, however, which resulted in an overall 
drop in travel — from 7.7 million trips in 
1973 to 7.5 million in 1974. 

• Destinations changed somewhat in 1974. 
Overseas travel increased in popularity (ac- 
counting for 14% of all trips, an increase from 
1 1% in the previous year). As a result, North 
American travel experienced a marginal de- 
cline. 

• Travel to the United States remained fairly 
constant in spite of the 1974 economic 
difficulties. In 1974, 22% vacationed on the 
U.S. Mainland, only slightly below the 1973 

level of 22%. 

• Vacation travel was less common among 
residents of the Maritime Provinces, while 
those who did travel indicated a much greater 
interest in Ontario and Western Canada, and 
less interest in New England and other U.S. 
coastal areas. 

• Residents of Quebec, on the other hand, 
tended to travel more within their home 
province. 

• The growth in foreign travel occurred pri- 
marily among residents of Ontario and Prairie 
Provinces. 

• One of the most dramatic changes in 1974 



travel patterns was with air travel. The pro- 
portion of trips taken by air remained con- 
stant at 17% from 1969 until 1972. Then, in 

1973, it rose to 24% and in 1974 increased to 
a record 32%. 

• Much of this growth was due to the 
increase in overseas travel and a switch 
from the automobile on trips to the 
United States, probably because of 
the fuel crisis. Travel in Canada also 
experienced a decline in automobile 
travel in favor of air travel. 

• Another very significant change in 1974 was a 
21% increase in expenditures from an average 
of $396 per trip to $479. 

• Projecting these expenditures, 
Canadians spent, in total, $2.39 
billion on vacation travel in 1974, up 
from $2.06 billion in 1973, an overall 
growth of 16.2%. 

• Visiting friends or relatives became more 
common among vacationers in Canada. In 

1974, 52% were motivated by that purpose, 
compared with 48% in 1973. 

B. Canadian Vacation Travel to the U.S. in 
1974 

• The U.S. (including the U.S. Islands) received 
3.9 million Canadian vacation visitors who 
spent an estimated $631 million while travel- 
ing in the U.S. in 1974. 

• In 1974, the U.S. Mainland received 3.6 
million Canadian vacation visitors (down 13% 
from 1973) who spent approximately $540 
million while traveling in the U.S. (up 12% 
over 1973). The average per capita expendi- 
ture per trip in the U.S. was $242. 

• In 1974, the largest proportion of Canadian 
vacation arrivals in the U.S. was received by 
the Far West (20%), followed by the South 
(19%), New England (16%), the Eastern Gate- 
way (13%), the Great Lakes Country (11%), 
the U.S. Islands (7%), the Old West (5%), 
George Washington Country (5%), and the 
Frontier West (4%). 

• In 1974, the largest proportion of Canadian 
vacation expenditures in the U.S. was received 



by the South (26%), followed by the Far West 
(22%), the U.S. Islands (14%), the Eastern 
Gateway (9%), the Great Lakes Country (7%), 
New England (7%), the Frontier West (5%), 
the Old West (4%), and George Washington 
Country (4%). 

Attitudes toward travel within Canada com- 
pared with the United States changed slightly. 
Between 1973 and 1974 Canada appeared to 
have re-enforced its traditional image of "in- 
teresting wIlderness ,, and "recreational attrac- 
tions;" and to have less of a "remoteness" 
perception; while the United States strength- 
ened its appeals of "entertainment," a "sense 
of freedom," warm weather, and educational 
advantages. 

• Some of the improvement in the 
image of the United States could be 
attributed to the fact that at the time 
of the previous survey (December, 
1973), with the threat of the "Energy 
Crisis," the U.S. could have been 
perceived as far less accessible with 
travel much more inhibited than at 
the time of this current survey. 

There were notable differences in the char- 
acteristics of Canadians who traveled to the 
various U.S. regions. For example: 

• George Washington Country, The 
South, the Great Lakes Country, and 
the Frontier West received the major- 
ity of their visitors from Ontario, 
whereas New England received the 
majority of it's Canadian visitors from 
Quebec. Both Ontario and Quebec 
were important sources for visitors to 
the Eastern Gateway. British Colum- 
bia was the most important source of 
visitors to the Far West and the U.S. 
Islands. The Old West received most 
of its Canadian vacationers from the 
Prairie Provinces. 

• Sightseeing was the most popular 
activity for Canadian vacation travel- 
ers to George Washington Country, 
the Old West, the Frontier West, the 
Far West and the U.S. Islands. Travel 
to the Great Lakes country was 
primarily to visit friends or relatives. 



The largest proportion of visitors to 
the South traveled to that area to 
spend time at a vacation spot. 
Canadian travel to New England and 
the Eastern Gateway was both to visit 
friends and relatives and to spend 
some time at a vacation spot. 

• The auto was primarily used in 
Canadian vacation travel to New 
England, the Eastern Gateway, George 
Washington Country, the Great Lakes 
Country, the Old West. The primary 
mode of transport used to travel to 
the South, the Frontier West and the 
U.S. Islands was air. Both air and auto 
transportation was used by visitors to 
the Far West. 

• Vacation visitors from Canada tended to be 
from urban areas, notably Ontario and 
Quebec, home-owners, married from "adults 
only" families and young or old. They had 
attended or completed high school, were in 
professional and skilled labor occupations and 
were upscale in income. 

• Canadian vacationers traveled to the U.S. in 
1974 primarily to spend some time at a 
vacation spot, to sightsee and visit friends or 
relatives. 

• Auto travel was more prevalent during the 
summer months while air travel was more 
popular during the winter. There was approxi- 
mately 2.36 persons traveling to the U.S. in 
each party and they spent an average of 1 1 
nights in the U.S. on their trip. 

• Canadian visitors to the U.S. who had a higher 
than average per capita expenditure per trip 
tended to: 

• reside in British Columbia, English 
Quebec, Ontario and the Prairies, and in 
urban areas; 

• visit the U.S. Islands, the South, the 
Frontier West and the Far West; 

• be 30-49 years of age and 50 years and 
over; 

• be married; 

• have an upper-middle income; 



• be employed in professional/sales/white- 
collar fields and retired/pensioned; 

• own their own dwelling; 

• have an elementary, high school or 
technical/preparatory education; 

• be from adult only "families"; 

• live in a detached or semi-detached 
dwelling or townhouse; 

• travel for the purpose of staying at a 
vacation spot or city sightseeing/shop- 
ping; 

• use air transportation; 

• travel from December to March or April 
to May; 

• stay 1 2 nights and over on their trip. 

• be male; 

• speak French (Quebec); 

• From 1973 to 1974, there was an increase in 
Canadian travel to the U.S. by: 

• urban visitors, 

• visitors from the Prairies and British 
Columbia, 

• visitors from cities with populations of 
over 500,000, and 1,000 to 10,000, 

• apartment dwellers and tenants, 

• visitors aged 40 to 49 years, 



• visitors with family incomes of $20,000 
or more, 

• visitors from 'adult only' families, 

• visitors who traveled to the U.S. to 
spend some time at a vacation spot, 

• visitors who traveled by air, 

• female visitors, 

• visitors who spent 4-5 nights in the U.S. 

• From 1973 to 1974 there was a decrease in 
Canadian travel to the U.S. by: 

• rural visitors. 

• visitors from the Atlantic Provinces. 

• visitors from cities with populations of 
under 1,000 and 10,000 to 30,000. 

• home owners. 

• male visitors. 

• visitors aged 1 8-29 years. 

• visitors who traveled by auto. 

• skilled workers. 

• visitors with family incomes between 
$10,000 and $20,000. 

• families with children, and 

• visitors who spent 1 to 3 nights in the 
U.S. 



C. SUMMARY OF CHARACTERISTICS OF CANADIAN VACATION 
TRAVEL TO THE U.S. IN 1974 



3,880,000 Canadian Vacation Arrivals in U.S. 

3,614,000 Canadian vacation arrivals on the U.S. Mainland (-13% from 1973) 

$631 Million Spent in the U.S. by Canadian Vacationers 

$540 million spent on U.S. Mainland by Canadian vacationers (+12% over 1973) 
$242 per capita expenditures per trip in U.S. 
$21 daily per capita trip expenditures in U.S. 



Traveler Characteristics 

Residence: 



Dwelling Status: 

Sex: 

Age: 

Marital Status: 

Education: 

Occupation: 

Family Income: 
Family Composition: 

Trip Characteristics 

Purpose: 

Mode of Transport: 

Seasonality: 

Mean Length of Stay: 



Urban (87%) 

Ontario (39%) and Quebec (25%) 
English speaking (68%) 
Population over 500,000 (46%) 

Live in single/semi-detached dwelling (65%) 
Own their own dwelling (62%) 

Female (54%) and male (46%) 

18-29 years ( 30%) and 50 years or more (31%) 

Attached (married) (59%) 

Attended or completed high school (50%) 

Professional/Mgr./Sales/White-collar (44%-) and skilled workers 

(22%) 

$10,000 to $20,000 (40%) and $20,000 and over (24%) 
Adults only (62%) 



To spend some time at a vacation spot (37%), sightseeing (36%), 
and visiting friends or relatives (33%) 

Auto (48%) and air (39%) 

3rd quarter (43%), July ( 1 9%), August ( 1 6%) 

1 1 nights 



Mean Size of Traveling Party: 2.36 persons 



SECTION II 



DETAILED FINDINGS OF CANADIAN VACATION TRAVEL 

IN 1974 



I. CANADIAN VACATIONS AND TRIPS 

In 1974, an estimated 58% of the Canadian 
adults took a vacation, unchanged from the 
1973 proportion. This proportion is divided into 
those who took a vacation trip away from home 
(55%) and those who stayed at home for their 
vacation (3%)— again virtually identical to the 
1973 pattern. Despite the "Energy Crisis" of 
1974, there was no significant change in the 
number of Canadians traveling on vacation in 
the year. During the past 9 years, 1972 was the 
peak year for Canadian travel. 



Viewed on a regional basis, however, fewer 
residents in the Atlantic Provinces took holidays 
in 1974 compared with the previous year (down 
from 49% in 1973 to 42% in 1974) and only 
39% of the Canadian adults in the Atlantic 
Provinces took trips in 1974, (down 9 percent- 
age points from 1973). No significant changes 
occurred in other regions of Canada. (See 
Appendix I-A and I-B.) 

British Columbia continued to be the most 
active region in Canada in generating vacation 
travel, while the East coast slumped to an even 



Chart 1 
CANADIAN VACATIONS AND VACATION TRIPS 

1966-1974 



Took Vacation 

Stayed Home 
Took Vacation Trip 



56% 



52% 



6% 



46% 



6% 



50% 



54% 



55% 



58% 



58% 



61% 



10% 



44% 



6% 



49% 



54% 



3% 



4% 



54% 



58% 



58% 



58% 



2% 



56% 



3% 



55% 



1966 



1967 



1968 



1969 



1970 



1971 



1972 



1973 



1974 



lower level than 1973. (See Appendix I-A and 
I-B.) 

The higher socio-economic strata and city 
dwellers also maintained their above average 
interest in trip-taking in 1974. (See Appendix 
I-B.) 



A. Frequency of Canadian Vacation Travel 

While the proportion of Canadians who traveled 
on a vacation in 1974 remained the same from 
1973, the number of vacation trips taken per 
traveler declined marginally -from an average of 
1.56 tripsin 1973 to 1.47 in 1974. 



Chart 2 

NUMBER OF VACATION TRIPS 

TAKEN BY CANADIANS EACH YEAR 

1966-1974 



Took Three + Trips 
Took Two Trips' 
Took One Trip 



Stayed At Home 




54% 



Average Number of Trips 
Among Travelers 



1966 

B 



10% 
12% 

36% 



42% 



_7%_ 
12% 

37% 



44% 



6"n 



11% 



38% 



45% 



1.73 




1.56 1.47 



B. Destination of Canadian Vacation Travelers 

In 1974, 7.5 million trips were taken by 
Canadians, a decrease of 2.7%"'from the 7.7 
million trips taken in 1973. There was a signif- 
icant increase in overseas travel by Canadians in 
1974, continuing a long-term upward trend. 
Specifically, in 1974, 66% of the trips were to 
Canadian destinations, 22% were to the U.S. 
(the U.S. Mainland and U.S. Islands), and 12% 
were to other countries. (See Appendices I-C, 
I-D and I-E.) 



Chart3 

DESTINATIONS OF CANADIAN 

TRAVELERS 

(International and Domestic) 



Destination 



Canada Only 



U.S. Mainland 



Overseas Countries 



67% 



22% 



11% 



66% 



21% 



14% 



1973 



1974 



Not available 



f Almost 2% of these travelers visited the U.S. Islands. An additional 7% 
visited Europe. 3% visited the Caribbean/Bermuda and 3% visited other destinations 



Travel to the U.S. remained relatively stable in 
1974, despite the "Energy Crisis. " Canadians 
made 1.5 million trips to the U.S. Mainland in 



1974, down 9% from 1973. Canadian trips to 
the U.S. Islands (which were not counted 
separately in previous reports) brought the total 
number of Canadian trips to the U.S. in 1974 to 
1,644,000, accounting for 22% of all Canadian 
vacation trips. (See Appendix I-C.) 

During 1974, the most popular U.S. destination 
of Canadian vacationers was the Far West, 
followed by the South, New England and the 
Eastern Gateway. (See Appendix I-F.) 

Although Canadian travel to the U.S. remained 
relatively stable in 1974, there was a slight shift 
in the regional travel patterns of Canadian 
visitors. From 1973 to 1974, there was a 
decrease in the proportion of Canadian vacation 
arrivals to the South, New England and the 
Eastern Gateway and an increase in the propor- 
tion of Canadian vacation arrivals in the Far 
West. (See Appendix I-F.) 

The most popular state traveled to by Canadian 
vacationers in 1974 was Florida, followed by 
New York, California, Washington, Maine, Mass- 
achusetts and New Jersey. From 1973 to 1974, 
the only state which increased its share of 
visitors from Canada was Washington. (See 
Appendix I-F.) 

Canadian vacationers occasionally took the op- 
portunity to visit several regions in the U.S. 
during their trip to the U.S. For example, 10% 
of the trips to New England included a stop-over 
in the Eastern Gateway. Twenty-five percent of 
the trips to George Washington Country in- 
cluded a visit to New York (Eastern Gateway) 
while 13% included a visit to Florida (South). 
Even 10% of the trips to the U.S. Islands 
included a stop-over at some point on the U.S. 
Mainland. (See Appendix I-G.) 

As the average number of Canadians per trip in 
1974 equaled 2.36, the 1.6 million trips to the 
U.S. resulted in 3.9 million arrivals. The fol- 
lowing chart reflects the distribution of these 
arrivals on a multiple basis. For example, al- 
though the Far West received 22% of the 
Canadian arrivals, this area was the primary 
destination for about 20%- of the total Canadian 
arrivals in the U.S. Two percent of an estimated 



113,000 were passing through on their way to 
other U.S. destinations. (See Appendix I-G.) 



Chart 4 

CANADIAN VACATION ARRIVALS 

IN THE U.S. 

1974 

Arrivals 
3,880,000 
115% 

US. Islands 
Frontier West 

George 
Washington 

— New England 

U.S. Unspecified 
2% 




Old West 



Note: Includes multiple answers 



Although Canadian vacation expenditures in the 
U.S. will be discussed in more detail in the next 
section, it can be noted here that in 1973 and 
1974 the U.S. region which received the largest 
proportion of the Canadian vacation expendi- 
tures was the South, followed by the Far West, 
U.S. Islands, Eastern Gateway, New England, 
the Great Lakes Country, the Frontier West, the 
Old West, and George Washington Country. It is 
interesting to note that although the proportion 
of Canadian arrivals in the South decreased from 
1973 to 1974, the proportion of Canadian 
expenditures in that area increased. The Far 
West, which received an increase in the propor- 
tion of visitors from 1973 to 1974, also in- 
creased its share of vacation receipts. New 
England and the Eastern Gateway, which re- 
corded decreases in the share of visitors from 
1973 to 1974, also showed decreases in the 
proportion of their Canadian vacation receipts. 



C. Canadian Vacation Expenditures 

One of the most outstanding changes in Cana- 
dian travel to the U.S. in 1974 is related to 
expenditures. In spite of the general decline in 
vacation arrivals, there was a substantial increase 



in expenditures in 1974. Total tourist spending 
by Canadians rose 16.2% from $2.0 billion in 
1973 to $2.4 billion in 1974. The average trip 
expenditure of $396 in 1973 increased to $479 
in 1974 or from $31 per day to $36 per day. 
(See Appendices I-H and I-I.) 



TABLE 1 
CANADIAN VACATION ARRIVALS AND EXPENDITURES IN THE UNITED STATES IN 1974 



Regional 
arrivals 



Total trip Daily trip 

Regional expenditures expenditures Per capita Daily per 

expenditures per vacation by vacation expenditures capita trip 

($ millions) party party for trip expenditures 



New England 610,000 

(16%) 

Eastern Gateway 501,000 

(13%) 

George Washington 

Country 202,000 

(5%) 

The South 729,000 

(19%) 

Great Lakes 

Country 408,000 

(11%) 

Old West 211,000 

(5%) 

Frontier West 137,000 

(4%) 

Far West 758,000 

(20%) 

U.S. Islands 266,000 

(7%) 

U.S. Unspecified 55,000 

(1%) 

Total U.S 3,880,000 

(100%) 



$ 46 

(7%) 

$ 55 

(9%) 

$ 27 

(4%) 

$166 
(26%) 

$ 46 

(7%) 

$ 28 

(4%) 

$ 30 

(5%) 

$136 
(22%) 

$ 91 
(14%) 

$ 6 

(2%) 

$631 
(100%) 



$ 303 

$ 392 

$ 544 

$ 910 

$ 376 

$ 408 

$ 727 

$ 545 
$1,350 

$ 420 

$ 570 



$37 
$48 

$49 
$52 

$41 
$44 
$46 
$47 
$88 
$30 

$50 



$120 

$165 

$213 

$367 

$163 
$181 
$333 
$258 
$565 
$158 

$242 



$15 
$20 

$15 
$21 

$18 
$19 
$21 
$22 
$37 
$11 

$21 



Expenditures of Canadian travelers to Alberta, 
British Columbia and the United States recorded 
the largest increase, partly attributed to the 
increased use of air travel to the United States 
and British Columbia, to the increased length of 
stay among vacationers to all three areas and to 
a general price increase due to inflation. 

Canadian vacation expenditures in the U.S. 
(including the U.S. Islands) totaled $631 million 
in 1974 or 26% or the total $2.4 billion spent by 
Canadian vacationers. Of the $631 million, $540 
million was spent on the U.S. Mainland, 1 1.8% 
more than the $483 million spent here in 1973. 
Vacationers to the United States spent an 
average of $570 per party. Mainland visitors 
spent slightly less than the average — $5 18, but 
appreciably more than they did in 1973 ($438). 

During 1974, there was a regional shift in the 
expenditure pattern of Canadian vacationers to 
the U.S. The South and Far West regions of the 
United States indicated gains in sharp contrast 
to the revenue losses of New England and other 
Eastern regions. (See Appendix I-F.) 

1. Per Capita Expenditures. The average per 
capita expeniture per trip for Canadian travel to 
the U.S. in 1974 was $242. Characteristics of 
travelers and their trips which had a higher than 
average per capita expenditure per trip are 
indicated as follows. (See Appendix F.) 

2. Profile of the Canadian Visitor to the U.S. 
with Above Average per Capita Trip Expendi- 
tures: 1974. 

Destination: 

U.S. Islands $565 

The South 367 

Frontier West 333 

Far West 258 

Residence: 

British Columbia 318 

English Quebec 259 

Ontario 250 

Prairies 247 

Age: 

30-39 years 256 

50 and over 255 



Sex: 

Male $264 

Language spoken: 

French Quebec 269 

Marital status: 

Attached 250 

Family composition: 

Adults only 247 

Urban/Rural residence: 

Urban 249 

Socio-Economic Level: 

Upper-middle 266 

Occupation of head of house: 

Professional/Sales/White collar 254 

Retired/Pensioned 257 

Education completed: 

Elementary school 294 

Community college 285 

High school 262 

Dwelling ownership: 

Owner 245 

Type of dwelling occupied: 

Town house/Other attached 255 

Detached/Semi-detached 246 

Dwellings other than that stated above 
and other than an apartment 304 

Purpose of trip: 

Total year: Staying at a vacation spot. . . 314 
June to September: All less than average 
October to May: Staying at a vacation 

spot 432 

Rural activities 323 

City sightseeing 307 

Mode of transport: 

Plane 403 

Seasonality of trip: 

December to March 405 

April to May 264 

Length of stay: 

18 nights and over 432 

12-17 nights 373 



10 



The following chart indicates the share of 
Canadian arrivals and receipts which each of the 
U.S. regions received in 1974. The arrival data 
has been prorated to equal 100% in order that it 
may be compared with the data on receipts. (See 
Appendix I-F.) 

When considering Canadian vacation trips to the 
U.S. by air travel only, the South is seen as the 
recipient of the largest share (34%) of the total 
air visitors to the U.S. Mainland, with Florida 
receiving 32%. This proportion of air travelers to 
the South is significantly below the 1973 share 
of 43%. Air travel was up however, among trips 
to the Far West; 32% in 1974 compared to 26% 



in 1973. Twenty two percent of the air trips to 
the U.S. in 1974 were to California. 

Of the Canadian air travel to the total U.S., (the 
U.S. Mainland plus the U.S. Islands), the South 
remained the U.S. region which received the 
largest share of the air travelers with 28%, 
followed by the Far West with 26%, and the 
U.S. Islands with 19% (See Appendix I-J.) 

Of the Canadian vacation auto trips to the U.S. 
in 1974, 26%- were to New England, 21%- were 
to the Far West, and 20% were to the Eastern 
Gateway. From 1973 to 1974, there was a 
decrease in the proportion of auto trips to the 
South. (See Appendix I-K.) 



Chart 5 

CANADIAN VACATION ARRIVALS AND EXPENDITURES IN THE U.S. 

1974 



Arrivals 

3,880,000 

100% 



U.S. Unspecified 

1% 



Frontier West 

George 

Washington-! 51% 
Country 

Old West 




Far 



22% 



Frontier West . 

George 
Washington - 
Country 



5% 



4% 



Receipts 




$631,000,000 




100% 




est 


U.S. Islands 

14% 


\ US. Unspecified 
/V 2% 

/"^ \ New 

7% \ England 




^^ Eastern 


Gateway 1 



9% 



Old West' 
Great Lakes Country' 



7% 



The South 

26% 



11 



597-433 O - 75 



Chart 6 

CANADIAN VACATION TRIPS 

TO THE U.S. IN 1974 

BY DESTINATION OF AIR VISITORS 



Destination 



US. Mainland 

(Excludes 

U.S. Islands) 



Total U.S. 
(Includes 
U.S. Islands) 



Chart 7 

CANADIAN VACATION TRIPS TO 

THE U.S. IN 1974 BY DESTINATION 

OF AUTO VISITORS 



Destination 



U.S. Mainland 

(Excludes 

US. Islands) 



Total U.S. 
(Includes 
U.S. Islands 



New England 

Eastern Gateway 

George Washington- — - 5% 
Country 

The South 



Great Lakes Country 
Old West 
Frontier West 
Far West 
U.S. Islands 
U.S. Unspecified 




_B% 

13% 



43% 



2%V 



34% 



_7%_ 
32% 



(Base) (171) (327) 

1973 1974 

Note: Includes multiple destinations within the U.S. 
* Data not applicable 



3%- 

4%., 
2%- 

2%. 


8% 
8% 

28% 

6% 
26% 

19% 



(397) 
1974 



New England 

Eastern Gateway 

George Washington Country 
The South 



Great Lakes Country 
Old West 
Frontier West 
Far West 
U.S. Islands 
U&Unspecified 



2%- 




28% 



20% 



J% 

18% 



16% 



7% 



17% 



2% 
2%m 



26% 



21% 



7% 



13% 



18% 



11% 



21% 



2% 



1% 
2%m 



7% 



13% 



18% 



11% 



21% 



(Base) 



(481) 
1973 



(492) 
1974 



(497) 
1974 



Note: Includes multiple destinations within the U.S. 
* Data not applicable 



The increase in air travel to the United States 
undoubtedly contributed to the rise in the 
average per capita expenditures per trip. Air 
vacationers spent more than twice as much 
($403) as travelers by automobile ($167). 
Canadians staying at vacation spots in the U.S'. 
continued to spend considerably more than the 
average -- $314 vs $242. Winter (December to 
March) vacationers also had above average ex- 
penditures ($405). The average per capita 
expenditure per trip for Canadians visiting the 
United States from October to May for the 
purpose of staying at a vacation spot was $432, 
compared to $208 during the months June to 
September. Canadians visiting friends or relatives 
were the least lucrative to the United States 
tourism industry. In 1974, those who traveled 
during the off-season to visit friends or relatives 
actually spent less than in the previous year. 
(See Appendix I-F.) 

3. Daily Per Capita Expenditures The average 
daily per capita trip expenditure of Canadian 



visitors to the U.S. in 1974 was $21. Generally, 
those persons who had an above average per 
capita expenditure per trip also had an above 
average daily per capita expenditure. Some 
exceptions where the daily per capita trip 
expenditure was above average whereas the per 
capita expenditure per trip was below average 
were by families with children under 18 years 
($24) and by persons in skilled labor professions 
($25). In addition, although persons who spent 
18 + nights in the U.S. had an above average per 
capita expenditure per trip, their daily per capita 
expenditure was far below average— $11. (See 
Appendix I-F.) 



II. TRAVELER CHARACTERISTICS 

The following section provides information on 
the residence of Canadian visitors, language 
spoken, dwelling status, sex, age, marital status, 
education, occupation, income, and family com- 
position. 



12 



A. Residence of Canadian Vacationers 

In 1974, 39% of the Canadian visitors to the 
U.S. came from Ontario, 25% from Quebec, 16% 
from British Columbia, and 15% from the 
Prairie Provinces. 

The residence of Canadian visitors to the U.S. 
changed slightly from 1973 to 1974. In 1974, 
the U.S. Mainland received 40%- of its Canadian 
vacation visitors from Ontario (down slightly 
from 41% in 1973) and 27% from Quebec (same 
as in 1973). There was also a decrease in the 
proportion of visitors to the U.S. Mainland from 
the Atlantic Provinces. The two regions which 
provided the U.S. Mainland with a larger share 
of visitors in 1974 than in 1973 were British 
Columbia and the Prairie Provinces. In 1973 
these two regions each provided 12% of the 
vacation visitors to the U.S. Mainland, compared 
to 14% for British Columbia and 15% for the 
Prairie Provinces in 1974. (See Appendix II-A.) 

Of the total air visitors to the U.S. (including the 
U.S. Islands), 40%- came from Ontario resi- 



dences, while 19% came from British Columbia 
and 19% from Quebec. On the other hand, 
Ontario was the provincial residence of 39% of 
the auto visitors to the U.S. in 1974 with 30% 
residing in Quebec; and 17% in the Prairie 
Provinces. (See Appendices I-J and I-K.) 

As could be expected, the proximity of various 
U.S. and Canadian regions had a considerable 
effect on the origin/destination pattern of 
Canadian vacation travel. 

Fifty seven percent of the Canadian trips to New 
England were made by residents of Quebec. 
Both Quebec and Ontario supplied the Eastern 
Gateway with a large proportion of their Cana- 
dian vacation trips— 46% and 47% respectively. 
About 67%. of the vacation trips to the South 
originated in Ontario. The Prairie Provinces were 
the source of 75% of the vacation trips to the 
Old West while British Columbia was the pri- 
mary residence for vacation trips to the Far 
West. Both British Columbia and Ontario were 
the primary sources for vacation trips to the 



Chart 8 

CANADIAN VACATION TRAVELERS TO THE U.S. 

IN 1974 BY RESIDENCE 



Residence 

Atlantic Provinces 
Quebec 



Ontario 



Prairies 

British Columbia - 
AHOther 



•1°/c 



To U.S. Mainland 
(Excludes US. Islands) 



7% 



27% 



41% 



12% 



12% 



27% 



40% 



15% 



14% 



ToU.S. 
(Includes U.S. Islands) 

Total Total 

Total U.S. Auto Visitors Air Visitors 



1% 



25% 



39% 



15% 



16% 



3% 



30% 



39% 



17% 



11% 



5% 



1% 



19% 



40% 



16% 



19% 



(Base) 



(741) 
1973 



(955) 
1974 



(1027) 



(355) 
1974 



(270) 



Note: A more detailed breakdown of residences within the Atlantic and Prairie Provinces is available in Appendix ll-A 
* Less than 14 of 1% 



13 



U.S. Islands. Eighty-six percent of the vacation 
trips to New Jersey were from Quebec. 

Regarding Canadian travel to overseas destina- 
tions, the province of Ontario generated the 
majority of travelers to Europe (55%) and to the 
Caribbean (69%). (See Appendix II-A.) 

With respect to the vacation destinations of 
major metropolitan area residents, about 30% of 
the travelers living in Winnipeg and 28% of the 
travelers living in English Montreal vacationed in 
the U.S. (including the U.S. Islands) in 1974. By 
way of comparison, only between 22%-23% of 
the trips by residents of Calgary/Edmonton and 
Toronto were made to the total U.S. in 1974. 
(See Appendices II-B and II-C.) 

Viewed another way, 25% of the Canadian 
vacation trips to the U.S. were to the Far West 
while 21% were to the South. Almost three 
fourths (72%) of the vacation trips made to the 



U.S. by residents of British Columbia were to 
the Far West. The most popular destination for 
Prairie Province residents was the Far West, 
which accounted for 46% of the trips made by 
Prairie Province residents, and the Old West 
(32%). The most popular destination of Atlantic 
Province residents was New England (68% of the 
trips). The destination of residents of Quebec 
and Ontario was quite varied. New England, the 
Eastern Gateway and the South were the most 
popular destinations for Quebec residents (ac- 
counting for 38%, 27% and 18%. of the trips, 
respectively). Ontario residents preferred the 
South (35% of the trips), the Great Lakes 
Country (21%), and the Eastern Gateway (18%). 
(See Appendix II-D.) 

Forty-six percent of the Canadian vacationers 
to the U.S. in 1974 were residents of cities with 
populations of over 500,000, a proportion 
slightly higher than that recorded in 1973. 



Chart 9 

CANADIAN VACATION TRIPS TO THE U.S. IN 1974 

BY SIZE OF CITY OF RESIDENCE 



City Size 



Canada 



U.S. Mainland 
(Excludes U.S. Islands) 



Total U.S. 
(Includes U.S. Islands) 



Over 500,000 



100,000 to 500,000 

30^00 to 100,000 
10X100 to 30/100 

1,000 to 10/100 

Under 1/100 



(Base) 



34% 



20% 



9% 



10% 



18% 



(2235) 
1973 



4% 



34% 



19% 



10% 



10% 



23% 



(2274) 
1974 



42% 



16% 



9% 



9% 



16% 



(741) 
1973 



46% 



16% 



10% 



6% 



11% 

11% 

(955) 
1974 



46% 



16% 



9% 



5% 



11% 



13% 



(1027) 
1974 



14 



Another 16% lived in cities within the 100,000 
to 500,000 population range, and 11% came 
from towns with populations of 1,000 or less. 
(See Appendix II-E.) 

In 1974, the per capita trip expenditures of 
residents of Ontario who traveled to the U.S. 
was $250, while that of residents of Quebec was 
$197. The highest per capita trip expenditure in 
the U.S. was made by residents of British 
Columbia ($318), while the lowest were made 
by residents of the Atlantic Provinces ($170). 

B. Urban/Rural Residence 

In 1974, 87% of the Canadian visitors to the 
U.S. (including the U.S. Islands), came from 
urban areas, while 1 3% came from rural areas. 

Canadians traveling within Canada also primarily 
resided within urban areas-82% in 1974. Nearly 
all of the Canadians who traveled to Europe and 
the Caribbean in 1974 were from urban areas- 
92%> and 99%, respectively. (See Appendix II-F.) 

There was a slight increase in the proportion of 
Canadian vacation travelers to the U.S. Mainland 
who came from urban areas in 1974. In 1973, 
this share had been 84%, but in 1974, the 
proportion rose to 87%. 



In 1974, 93%o of the Canadian vacationers 
visiting the George Washington Country resided 
in urban areas within Canada, the highest such 
proportion among travel to the various U.S. 
regions. The highest ratio of Canadian visitors 
coming from rural areas occured among those 
travelers to the Old West in 1974 (20%). 

As might be expected, the average Canadian 
visitor to the U.S. in 1974 coming from a urban 
residence spent more ($249) during his trip than 
did the average visitor coming from a rural area 
within Canada (who had a per capita trip 
expenditure of $193). 



C. Language Spoken 

The proportion of English-speaking Canadians 
who traveled both within Canada and to the 
U.S. Mainland, changed very little from 1973 to 
1974. In 1974, 67% of the Canadian vacation 
visitors to the U.S. Mainland spoke English, 
compared to 69% in 1973. Seventeen percent of 
the Canadian travelers to the U.S. Mainland in 
1974 spoke French. The proportion of French- 
speaking travelers to New England, the Eastern 



Chart 10 

CANADIAN VACATION TRAVELERS 

TOTHEU.S.IN1974BY 

URBAN/RURAL RESIDENCE 



Chart 11 
CANADIAN VACATION TRAVELERS 
TO THE U.S. IN 1974 BY 
LANGUAGE SPOKEN 



Urban vs 
Rural Residence 



Canada 



Urban 



Rural 



82% 



18% 



82% 



18% 



(Base) 



(2235) (2274) 
1973 1974 



U.S. Mainland Total US. 
(Excludes (Includes 

U.S. Islands) U.S. Islands) 



16% 



87% 



13% 



13% 



(741) 
1973 



(955) 
1974 



(1027) 
1974 



Note: See Appendix ll-F for a more detailed breakdown of rural visitors 



Language 



Canada 



English 



French 
(Quebec) 

French > 
(Non-Quebec) 
\%J 



Other - 



70% 



16% 



10% 



4% 



70% 



17% 
9% 



U.S. Mainland Total U.S. 
(Excludes (Includes 
U.S. Islands) U.S. Islands) 



2%-: 



18% 



11% 



1%- 



67% 



17% 
15% 



1% 



68% 



16% 



15% 



(Base) 



(2235) (2274) 
1973 1974 



(741) 
1973 



(955) 
1974 



(1027) 
1974 



15 



Gateway and George Washington Country, how- 
ever, was higher than the national proportion 
reflecting the importance of the province of 
Quebec to these three U.S. regions. Specifically, 
French-speaking Canadians, accounted for 42% 
of the total Canadian vacationers to the New 
England Region and one-fourth of all Canadian 
travelers to the Eastern Gateway and George 
Washington Country. (See Appendix II-G.) 

The average French (Quebec )-speaking Canadian 
spent $269 during his/her trip to the U.S. in 
1974, up substantially from the $185 per capita 
expenditure applicable to this group in 1973. 



Of the Canadian vacationers who traveled only 
domestically, 63% owned their own homes (up 
from 59% in 1973) and 36% were tenants. 

Home ownership was prominent among Cana- 
dians visiting the Old West in 1974 (75%). 
Rent-paying tenants, on the other hand, com- 
prised almost half (47%) of the Canadian 
travelers to the Eastern Gateway in 1974. (See 
Appendix II-H.) 

The per capita trip expenditures of the Canadian 
homeowners and tenants visiting the U.S. in 
1974 were relatively the same— $245 for home- 
owners and $241 for tenants. 



D. Dwelling Ownership 

During 1974, six-in-ten (62%) of the Canadian 
visitors to the U.S. (including the U.S. Islands), 
were homeowners. Another 37% of these visitors 
to the U.S. were tenants. In 1974, 61% of the 
Canadian vacation travelers to the U.S. Mainland 
were owners of their own homes (compared to 
65% in 1973). Thirty-eight percent of these 
visitors to the U.S. Mainland were tenants, 
reflecting a significant increase from the 1973 
figure of 32% who paid rent for their residences. 



E. Type of Dwelling Inhabited 

In 1974, 65% of the Canadian visitors to the 
U.S. (including the U.S. Islands) lived in single 
semi-detached houses; 12% lived in row house- 
type dwellings; and 21% lived in apartments. 
The same large majority (65%) of the Canadian 
vacation travelers to the U.S. Mainland in 1974 
lived in single/semi-detached homes. The most 
significant change in types of dwellings of 
Canadians traveling to the U.S. Mainland from 



Chart 12 

CANADIAN VACATION TRAVELERS 
TO THE U.S. IN 1974 
BY DWELLING OWNERSHIP 



Chart 13 

CANADIAN VACATION TRAVELERS 

TO THE U.S. IN 1974 

BY TYPE OF DWELLING 



Tenant vs. Owner Canada 



Owner 



Tenant 



Not Stated 
\ 



4% 



59% 63% 



37% 



1%. 



(Base) 



36% 



U.S. Mainland Total U.S. 
(Excludes (Includes 

U.S. Islands) US. Islands) 



3% 



65% 61% 



32% 



38% 



1% 



(2235) (2274) 
1973 1974 



(741) 
1973 



(955) 
1974 



62% 



37% 



(1027) 
1974 



Type of Dwelling Canada 



Single/ 
Semi-Detached 



Row House 

Apartment 
Other 3% 



66% 



13% 



17% 



3% 



11% 



18% 



US. Mainland Total U.S. 
(Excludes (Includes 
US. Islands) U.S. Islands) 



2% 



67% 



15% 



16% 



2% 



65% 



13% 



21% 



2% 



12% 
21% 



(Base) (2235) (2274) (741) (955) (1027) 

1973 1974 1973 1974 1974 

Note: Totals may not add to 100% due to rounding 



16 



1973 to 1974 occurred among the proportion 
living in apartments. In 1973, only 16% lived in 
apartments, but this share had risen to 21% by 
1974. 

Eight-in-ten (81%) of the Canadian visitors to 
the Old West in 1974 resided in single/semi- 
detached homes, while among those traveling to 
the Eastern Gateway, 28% lived in apartments. 
(See Appendix II-I.) 

Canadian travelers to the U.S. who lived in a row 
house/townhouse had the highest per capita trip 
expenditures in 1974— $255— while apartment- 
dwellers had the lowest average trip expenditure 
per person— $217. 



F. Sex 

The male-female ratio among Canadian vacation 
travelers to the U.S. Mainland represented a 
marked change between 1973 and 1974. During 
1974, 46%. of the visitors were male and 54%. 
were female, reflecting a definite shift from the 
51% male/49% female distribution among these 
travelers to the U.S. Mainland in 1973. This shift 
was also evidenced among Canadian domestic 
travelers: from a 50% male/50% female ratio in 
1973 to a distribution of 48% males and 52% 
females in 1974. 

There were regional variations from this overall 
trend in Canadian travel to the U.S. in 1974. 
Fifty-five percent of the Canadian visitors to the 
Eastern Gateway were male, the same propor- 
tion of males among Canadians traveling to the 
U.S. Islands. The New England region had the 
lowest percentage of Canadian male visitors in 
1974-42%. (See Appendix II-J.) 

Male travelers to the U.S. from Canada had a 
higher per capita trip expenditure in 1974 than 
did their female counterparts. The average 
Canadian male spent $264 during his trip, while 
females on the average spent $220 each. 



G. Age 

In 1974, 30% of the Canadian vacation visitors 
to the U.S. (including the U.S. Islands), were 
18-29 years, 19% were 30-39 years, 20% were 
40-49 years and 31% were 50 years or older. 



Chart 14 

CANADIAN VACATION TRAVELERS 

TO THE U.S. IN 1974 

BY SEX 



Sex 



Male 



Canada 



U.S. Mainland Total U.S. 
(Excludes (Includes 

U.S. Islands) U.S. Islands) 



Female 



50% 48% 



50% 



52% 



51% 46% 46% 



49% 



54% 



54% 



(Base) 



(2235) (2274) 
1973 1974 



(741) (955) (1027) 
1973 1974 1974 



Chart 15 
CANADIAN VACATION TRAVELERS 
TO THE U.S. IN 1974 BY AGE 



Age (Years) 

18-29 

30-39 
4049 
50 + 



Canada 



U.S. Mainland Total U.S. 
(Excludes (Includes 

US. Islands) U.S. Islands) 



39% 



19% 



17% 



25% 



36% 



18% 



16% 
29% 



35% 



17% 
17% 
30% 



30% 



19% 



20% 
31% 



30% 
19% 



20% 
31% 



(Base) (2235) (2274) (741) (955) (1027) 

1973 1974 1973 1974 1974 

Note: Totals may not add to 100% due to rounding 



17 



Similar to the trend within Canada, Canadian 
vacationers to the U.S. Mainland in 1974 were 
somewhat older than was the case in 1973. The 
most noticeable change occurred in the 18-29 
years-of-age group; in 1973, this segment ac- 
counted for 35% of the Canadians visiting the 
U.S. Mainland, but in 1974, the proportion 
declined to 30%. On the other hand, the 
proportion of Canadian travelers to the U.S. 
Mainland in the 40-49 age group rose from 17% 
in 1973 to 20% in 1974. 

The median age of Canadians visiting America in 
1974 appeared to be around 40 years of age: 
49% were under 40 and 5 1% were 40 or over. 

There did not appear to be any significant age 
difference between Canadians visiting the U.S. 
and Europe. Canadian visitors to the Carribean, 
however, were somewhat younger than Canadian 
visitors to the U.S. Among U.S. destinational 
regions, the Old West had the "youngest" group 
of Canadian visitors in 1974. During this year, 
35% of the travelers to this region were 18-29 
years old, while another 24% were 30-39 years 
of age. The South had the largest percentage of 
"50 and over ,, aged Canadian visitors in 
1974-40%-and the Eastern Gateway had the 
least proportion of travelers belonging to this 
age group— 26%. (See Appendix II-K.) 

The 30-39 age group among Canadians visiting 
the U.S. in 1974 had the highest per capita trip 
expenditure-$256— while the 18-29 age group 
had the lowest-$220. 



Chart 16 

CANADIAN VACATION TRAVELERS 

TO THE U.S. IN 1974 

BY MARITAL STATUS 



Marital Status 



Attached 
(Married) 



Canada 



U.S. Mainland Total U.S. 

(Excludes (Includes 

U^. Islands) U.S. Islands) 



Unattached 



60% 



39% 



59% 



41% 



61% 



39% 



60% 



59% 



41% 



(Base) 



(2235) (2274) 
1973 1974 



(741) 
1973 



(955) 
1974 



(1027) 
1974 



persons in 1974. The average attached Canadian 
who traveled to the U.S. in 1974 spent $250 
during his/her trip, slightly more than the 
average total Canadian expenditure figure of 

$242. 



H. Marital Status 

In 1974, 59% of the Canadian vacation visitors 
to the U.S. (including the U.S. Islands) were 
attached (married) while 41% were unattached. 

The largest share of unattached Canadian 
travelers occurred among visitors to the Frontier 
West (58%), while the Old West claimed the 
largest share of attached visitors (74%). (See 
Appendix II-L.) 

There did not appear to be any significant 
difference in 1974 in the marital status of 
Canadians who vacationed in the U.S. versus 
overseas destinations. 

Attached persons tended to have a higher per 
capita trip expenditure rate than did unattached 



I. Education 

One-half of Canadian vacation travelers to the 
U.S. (including U.S. Islands) in 1974 had a 
mid-level education, having either attended or 
graduated from high school. In addition, one- 
quarter of the visitors had attended or com- 
pleted university or higher education. This pro- 
portion of university-educated Canadian 
travelers increased slightly from 1973 to 1974. 
In addition, 14% had attended or completed 
technical school and 1 1% had only an elemen- 
tary school education. (See Appendix II-M.) 

In 1974, a higher proportion of college-educated 
Canadians traveled to the U.S. regions of George 
Washington Country (35%), the Eastern Gate- 
way (32%), the Old West (31%), the U.S. Islands 



18 



(30%), and the Far West (29%), than to the 
nation as a whole. On the other hand, the 
Frontier West region had more than double the 
proportion of travelers with only an elementary 
education (23%) than the U.S. as a whole (1 1%). 

Generally, Canadian vacation travelers to Europe 
and the Caribbean had a higher education than 
travelers to the U.S. In 1974, 37% of the 
Canadian visitors to Europe and 33% of the 
visitors to the Caribbean had attended or com- 
pleted university studies. 

Although those Canadian visitors with only a 
primary school education had the lowest daily 
per capita trip expenditure ($18), this group had 
the longest average length of stay (16.5 nights in 
the U.S.), and consequently had the highest per 
capita trip expenditure ($294). 

J. Occupation of Head of Household 

In 1974, 44%- of the heads of households of 
Canadian vacation visitors to the U.S. (including 
the U.S. Islands) were employed in 
professional/sales/white collar fields. An ad- 
ditional 22% had skilled labor jobs. Between 
1973 and 1974, the proportion of professional/ 
sales/white collar travelers to the U.S. remained 
about the same, while there was a decrease in 



the skilled worker group. Skilled workers ac- 
counted for 23% of the visitors to the U.S. 
Mainland in 1974 (compared to 27%- in 1973) 
while the proportion of retired heads of house- 
holds increased from 8% in 1973 to 10% in 
1974. 

Of the Canadian vacation travelers to the George 
Washington Country region in 1974, 52% were 
from the white-collar, professional occupations 
groups. The lowest proportion of Canadian 
travelers within this group occurred among those 
visiting the Great Lakes Country region (38%) 
and the Frontier West (38%). As expected the 
highest porportion of retired persons visited the 
South (14%), particularly Florida (16%). (See 
Appendix II-N.) 

Canadian travelers to Europe and the Caribbean 
were generally from families in higher income 
professions than visitors to the U.S. Fifty-seven 
percent of the Canadian travelers to Europe and 
58% of the travelers to the Caribbean were 
members of families whose head was employed 
in professional/sales/white collar fields. 

Those Canadian vacation travelers to the U.S. 
who were members of families whose head was 
pensioned/retired and the highest per capita trip 



Chart 17 

CANADIAN VACATION TRAVELERS TO 
THE U.S. IN 1974 BY EDUCATION 



Education 
(Attended or Completed) 



No Formal Education 1% 

Primary School 14% 



High School 



Technical/Preparatory School 
University or Higher Education 



Canada 

1% 



U.S. Mainland 
(Excludes U.S. Islands) 



Total U.S. 
(Includes U.S. Islands) 



53% 



13% 



20% 



16% 



48% 



15% 



20% 



13% 



51% 



14% 



22% 



11% 



51% 



13% 



24% 



11% 



50% 



14% 



25% 



(Base) 



(2235) 
1973 



(2274) 
1974 



(741) 
1973 



(955) 
1974 



(1027) 
1974 



Note: Totals may rot add to 100% due to rounding See Appendix ll-M lor a more detailed breakdown of this chart 
* Less than 'A of 1% 



19 



Chart 18 

CANADIAN VACATION TRAVELERS TO THE U.S. IN 1974 
BY OCCUPATION OF HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD 



Occupation of 
Head of Household 



Canada 



U.S. Mainland 
(Excludes U.S. Islands) 



Total U.S. 
(Includes U.S. Islands) 



Professional/MgrV 
Sales/White-Collar 



Skilled Workers 



Unskilled Workers 
Students 
Retired Persons 

Other*/Refused 



2% 



3% 



42% 



26% 



7% 



9% 



13% 



1% 



45% 



27% 



5% 



14% 



3% 



44% 



23% 



6% 



10% 



3% 



44% 



22% 



6% 



14% 



(Base) 



Primarily includes housewives and farmers 



(2235) 
1973 



(2274) 
1974 



(741) 
1973 



(955) 
1974 



(1027) 
1974 



expenditure rate in 1 974— $257. The groups 
having the lowest average trip expenditure per 
traveler were farmers ($160) and students 
($163). 

K. Family Income 

In 1974, 24% of the Canadian vacation visitors 
to the U.S. (including the U.S. Islands) came 
from families which had an annual income of 
$20,000 or more. (See Appendices II-O and 
II-P.) 

The more significant change in the family 
income levels of the Canadian visitors to the 
U.S. Mainland from 1973 to 1974 was an 
increase in the proportion of travelers from the 
highest income bracket. In 1974, 24% of the 
Canadian travelers to the U.S. Mainland were 
members of families earning $20,000 or over on 



an annual basis, while in 1973, this proportion 
was only 1 8%. This trend was even more 
noticeable among those Canadians who vaca- 
tioned only within Canada: in 1973, the propor- 
tion of these traveling families earning $20,000 
or more was only 11%, but in 1974, the 
proportion rose to 20%. 

There was a greater proportion of Canadian 
travelers in the $20,000 and over family income 
level who traveled to Europe and the Caribbean 
than there was among travelers to the U.S. in 
1974. Thirty-four percent of the Canadian 
visitors to Europe and 39% of the visitors to the 
Caribbean were in the $20,000 and over family 
income level in 1974. 

The U.S. Islands received the largest proportion 
of travelers in the $20,000 and over income level 
(31%) followed by the South with 29%. In 
addition, the individual states of Massachusetts 



20 



Chart 19 

CANADIAN VACATION TRAVELERS TO THE U.S. 

IN 1974 BY FAMILY INCOME 



Family Income 



Canada 



US. Mainland 
(Excludes U.S. Islands) 



Total U.S. 
(Includes U.S. Islands) 



Under $5000 



$5000 to $7499 



$7500 to $9999 



$10,000 to $14,999 



$15,000 to $16,999 

$17,000 to $19,999 
$20^00 and Over 

Refused 



11% 



14% 



15% 



26% 



11% 



11% 



4% 3% 



11% 



10% 



14% 



25% 



9% 



20% 



10% 



11% 



14% 



25% 



11% 



7% 



18% 



4% 



10% 



9% 



12% 



22% 



10% 



8% 



24% 



6% 



10% 



9% 



12% 



22% 



10% 



24% 



6% 



(Base) 



(2235) 
1973 



(2274) 
1974 



Note: Totals mav not add to 100% due to rounding 



(741) 
1973 



(955) 
1974 



(1027) 
1974 



and Florida received a higher proportion of 
visitors whose family incomes were $20,000 or 
more, 33% and 29% respectively, than the 
national proportion (24%). 

L. Family Composition 

In 1974, the majority (62%) of Canadian 
travelers to the U.S. (including the U.S. Islands) 



were from "adults only" families. Only 38% of 
the visitors to the U.S. came from families with 
children under 18. (See Appendix II-Q.) 

In 1974, 62% of the Canadians who traveled to 
the U.S. Mainland on vacation trips came from 
families consisting of "adults only,"' reflecting a 
significant increase from 1973 when 56% of 
these visitors came from this group. 



21 



Chart 20 

CANADIAN VACATION TRAVELERS 
TO THE U.S. IN 1974 BY 
FAMILY COMPOSITION 



Family 
Composition 



Adults Only 



Canada 



US. Mainland Total U.S. 
(Excludes (Includes 
U.S. Islands) U.S. Islands) 



Adults 
with Children 



51% 



54% 



56% 



44% 



62% 



38% 



62% 



38% 



(Base) (2235) (2274) (741) (955) (1027) 
1973 1974 1973 1974 1974 

Note: See Appendix ll-Q for a more detailed breakdown 



The average number of adults in the household 
of Canadians who traveled to the U.S. in 1974 
was 1.59. (See Appendix II-R.) 

Of the 38% of Canadian visitors to the U.S. 
Mainland who came from families which in- 
cluded children (down from 44% in 1973) in 
1974, 13% had children under five years of age 
(compared to 20% in 1973) and 27% had 
children from 5-14 years of age (compared to 
32% in 1973). 

The proportion of Canadian vacationers from 
families consisting of "adults only" was highest 
among visitors to the Frontier West in 1974 
(84%), and lowest among Canadian travelers to 
the Old West (53%). (See Appendix II-Q.) 

With respect to spending in the U.S., the per 
capita trip expenditure was higher among the 
"adults only" Canadian visitors, equally $247 
per person compared to $233 for travelers who 
came from families with children under 18. 



III. TRIP CHARACTERISTICS 

The following section provides information on 
the purpose of trip, total number of adults in 
the party, mode of transportation, seasonality 
and length of stay. 

A. Purpose of Trip 

The most popular reasons for Canadian travel to 
the U.S. (including the U.S. Islands) in 1974 was 
to spend time at a vacation spot (37%), to sight- 
see (36%) and to visit friends and relatives 
(33%). (See Appendices III-A and III-B.) 

When considering changes in Canadian vacation 
to the U.S. Mainland only, from 1973 to 1974 
there was a slight increased interest in traveling 
to the U.S. mainland to visit friends and relatives 
(36% in 1974), and to spend time at a vacation 
spot (35% in 1974). 

The purpose of the trip varied considerably by 
destination within the U.S. Visiting friends or 
relatives accounted for over 35% of the trips to 
the Great Lakes Country, the Old West, New 
England, the Eastern Gateway and the Far West. 
Spending time at a vacation spot was the most 
important reason for travel to the South. Sight- 
seeing by Canadian vacation visitors was more 
prevalent in the Old West, the Far West and 
George Washington Country than it was in any 
other area. 

Over 45% of the Canadian vacation trips to 
Massachusetts and California were to visit 
friends or relatives. Almost three-quarters (73%) 
of the trips to New Jersey and 59% of the trips 
to Florida were to spend some time at a vacation 
spot. Sightseeing was very popular in Washing- 
ton— 70% of the trips to that state were for that 
purpose. 

With respect to Canadian travel to Europe, 57% 
of the visitors to that area went to visit friends 
and relatives and 42% to sightsee. About 70% of 
the Canadian trips to the Caribbean were to 
spend some time at a vacation spot. 

In addition to destination, length of stay and 
season of the year also affected the purpose of 
the trip. Almost half (45%) of the Canadians 
who stayed in the U.S. in 1974 for 1 to 5 nights 
were visiting friends or relatives. Visitors 



22 



Chart 21 

CANADIAN VACATION TRIPS TO THE U.S. 
IN 1974 BY PURPOSE OFTRIP 



Purpose of Trip 



To Visit Friends and Relatives 



To Stay At Summer 
Place I Own 



■4% 



To Spend Some Time 
At Vacation Spot 

Camping/Tenting/Fishing/ 
Boating/Or Other - 
Outdoor Activities 

Sightseeing 

Shopping 

To Attend Sports Festivals 

and Other Special Events w 

Combined Business \5%- . 

and Pleasure 

Other 5% 



48% 



18% 



Canada 



4% 



52% 



19% 



28% 



24% 



2% 



6% 
6% 

6% 



U.S. Mainland 
(Excludes US. Islands) 







36% 


34% 


2% 




35% 




32% 


15% 


13% 


35% 


34% 


7% 




8% 




9% 


8% 




7% 



Total U.S. 
(Includes U.S. Islands) 



2% 



33% 



37% 



14% 



7% 



(Base) 



Note: Includes multiple answers 



(2235) 
1973 



(2274) 
1974 



(741) 
1973 



(955) 
1974 



(1027) 
1974 



traveling to the U.S. for the purpose of spending 
time at a vacation spot generally tended to stay 
in excess of 6 days. (See Appendix III-C.) 

With respect to seasonality, visitors to the U.S. 
during April to May and October to November 
came to visit friends and relatives. Trips to the 
U.S. from December to March, were generally 
for the purpose of spending time at a vacation 
spot. (See Appendix III-D.) 

The highest per capita trip expenditures in the 
U.S. were made by persons who stayed at a 
vacation spot— $314. Although Canadians who 
traveled to the U.S. to sightsee or shop had a 
lower per capita trip expenditure ($243), they 
had the same daily per capita trip expenditure as 
persons who stayed at a vacation spot— $17. This 



was primarily due to the shorter length of stay 
of sightseers and shoppers. 

With respect to Canadian travel within Canada, 
the majority of trips taken in 1974 were for the 
purpose of visiting friends and relatives (52%). 

It is interesting to note that the most significant 
change in purpose of trips with respect to both 
the U.S. Mainland and Canada between 1973 
and 1974, was the increase in the proportion of 
trips for the purpose of visiting friends and 
relatives. 



B. Total Number of Adults in Party 

In 1974, the average number of Canadian adults 
in the party traveling to the U.S. was 2.36, 



23 



slightly below the 1973 average party size of 
2.46 adults. 

In 1974, the mean number of Canadians who 
traveled within Canada was 2.29, compared to 
2.13 for Canadian travelers to Europe and 2.90 
for travelers to the Caribbean. (See Appendix 
III-E.) 

It appears, however that in 1974 there were 
slightly more adults per party in trips to the U.S. 
than on trips within Canada, (average number of 
adults per party was estimated at 2.29) or on 
trips to Europe (average adult party size was 
estimated at 2.13). On the other hand there was 
a slightly greater number of adults per traveling 
party to the Caribbean (2.90) than to the U.S. 
(2.36). 

C. Mode of Transportation 

In 1974, perhaps reflecting gasoline unavail- 
ability, there was a significant increase in the use 
of the airplane and a corresponding decrease in 
the use of the automobile for Canadian vaca- 
tions. For example, in 1973, 24% of the total 
Canadian vacation trips were by air compared to 
32% in 1974. The proportion of auto trips 
decreased from 64% in 1973 to 56% in 1974 
during this period. (See Appendix III-F.) 

With respect to Canadian travel to the U.S. 
(including the U.S. Islands), although auto trips 
accounted for the major share (48%) of 
Canadian vacation trips in 1974, air trips fol- 
lowed closely accounting for 39%. (Appendix 
III-G.) 

For purposes of comparison, air travel was used 
on 34% of the U.S. Mainland trips in 1974, up 
11 points from 23% in 1973. Air travel in 
general was much more commonplace among 
the upper-income and well-educated strata of 
the Canadian population. (See Appendix III-H 
for the complete profile of the Canadian vaca- 
tion air traveler.) Travel by bus, train, ship and 
motor camper to the U.S. remained relatively 
stable in 1974. 

As expected the mode of travel to the U.S. 
mainland and the U.S. islands was considerably 
different. While 34% of Canadian visitors to the 
U.S. Mainland came by air, 52% came by auto. 
With respect to the U.S. Islands, 96% of the 



Chart 22 

CANADIAN VACATION TRIPS 

TO THE U.S. IN 1974 BY 
MAIN MODE OF TRANSPORT 



Main Mode 
of Transport 



Canada 



US. Mainland Total U.S. 
(Excludes (Includes 

U.S. Islands) U.S. Islands) 





Ship 

Motor ^1%\ 

Camper- 4%\ 

Other 3%- 



6% 



20% 
65% 



1%, 
1% 
3%^ 



23% 



9% 



34% 



52% 




39% 



48% 



9% 



(Base) 



(2235) (2274) 
1973 1974 



(741) 
1973 



(955) (1027) 
1974 1974 



Note: Includes multiple answers 



visitors traveled to this region by air. (See 
Appendix III-G). 

With respect to specific U.S. Mainland regions, 
over half of the Canadian visitors to the South 
and Frontier West traveled by air, while the 
majority of the visitors to the Old West (80%), 
New England (74%), the Great Lakes Country 
(70%) and the Eastern Gateway Region (67%) 
traveled there by auto. 

In addition, on a state basis, 62% of Florida's 
visitors came by air while 90% of Maine's visitors 
and 65% of Washington's visitors came by auto, 
auto. 

The mode of transportation used by Canadian 
vacation travelers to the U.S. varied significantly 
by season. For example, approximately 66% of 
the trips to the U.S. during December to March 
were by air, whereas only 23% of June to 
September trips to the U.S. were by air. (See 
Appendix III-I.) 



24 



There appeared to be a direct relationship 
between the number of nights spent by Cana- 
dians in the U.S. and the mode of transport 
used. In 1974, 27% of the 1 to 5 night trips to 
the U.S. were by air and 61% by auto. By way 
of contrast, about 54% of the 18 and over night 
trips to the U.S. were by air and only 33%> by 
auto. (See Appendix III-J.) 

The residence of Canadian vacation air travelers 
also varied by U.S. destinations. For example, 
57% of the air travelers to the South came from 
Ontario and 25% from Quebec while 32% of the 
Canadian air travelers to the Far West resided in 
British Columbia and 25% in the Prairies. (See 
Appendix I-K.) 

The residence of Canadian vacation auto 
travelers to various U.S. destination also dif- 
fered. For example, about 66% of the Canadian 
auto travelers to the New England region were 
from Quebec, while 43% of the auto travelers to 
the Far West were from British Columbia. (See 
Appendix I-L.) 

Canadian air visitors had a much higher per 
capita trip expenditure in the U.S. ($403) than 
did auto visitors ($167) in 1974. 

D. Seasonality 

During 1974, the most popular period for 
Canadian vacation travel to any destination was 
during the third quarter of the year, accounting 
for 53%) of all Canadians traveling on vacation. 
(Appendix III-K.) Similarly, Canadians visiting 
the U.S. (including the U.S. Islands) in 1974, 
preferred to travel during the summer months 
43% of the Canadian vacationers traveled to the 
U.S. during that period. 

The seasonality of Canadian trips to the U.S. 
Mainland, (See Appendix III-L.) was almost, 
unchanged from 1973 to 1974. During 1974, 
45% of the Canadian vacation travelers to the 
U.S. Mainland came during the third quarter of 
the year. The remaining 55% of the vacation 
travel from Canada was relatively evenly distri- 
buted among the other three quarters in 1974. 

Canadian vacation travel to the U.S. mainland 
was primarily summer-oriented, with 53% of 
Canadian visitors in 1974 traveling here during 
June to September (compared to 51% in 1973). 



Chart 23 

CANADIAN VACATION TRIPS TO 
THE U.S. IN 1974 BY SEASONALITY 
(Quarterly) 



Quarter Trip Started Canada 



US. Mainland Total U.S. 
(Excludes (Includes 

U.S. Islands) U.S. Islands) 



6%- 



Rrst Quarter 
Second Quarter 

Third Quarter 
Fourth Quarter 



18% 



62% 



14% 



8% 



18% 



59% 



15% 



20% 



17% 



44% 



19% 



18% 



18% 



45% 



19% 



20% 



18% 



43% 



19% 



(Base) 



(2235) (2274) 
1973 1974 



(741) (955) (1027) 
1973 1974 1974 



The winter months were the next most popular 
time for trips to the U.S.— 23% of the Canadian 
trips to the U.S. Mainland took place during the 

Chart 24 

CANADIAN VACATION TRIPS 

TO THE U.S. IN 1974 BY SEASONALITY 

(By Periods) 



Period Trip 
Started 



December to' 
March 

April to May 



June to 
September 



October to 
November 



Canada 



U^. Mainland Total US. 
(Excludes (Includes 
U.S. Islands) US. Islands) 



10% 



9% 



70% 



11% 



6%" 



13% 



74% 



7% 



26% 



10% 



51% 



13% 



23% 



10% 



53% 



14% 



26% 



10% 



51% 



13% 



(Base) 



(2235) (2274) 
1973 1974 



(741) (955) (1027) 
1973 1974 1974 



25 



cold weather season from December to March. 
(See Appendix III-M.) 

June and July were the heaviest vacation travel 
months among Canadians visiting the U.S. Main- 
land. Twenty percent of Canadian trips occurred 
during June, and another 17% occured in July. 
(See Appendix III-N.) 

Parenthetically, domestic vacation trips by 
Canadians in 1974 were also taken primarily 
during the third quarter (59% — compared with 
62% in 1973). The most popular individual 
months for Canadians vacationing only within 



Canada were July (29%) and August (22%). (See 
Appendix III-N.) 

America's appeal as a winter destination in 1974 
was reflected by the relatively heavy Canadian 
travel to specific U.S. "sun destinations" during 
this period. Of the Canadian vacation trips to 
the U.S. Islands in 1974, 59% took place during 
the cold weather months from December to 
March. Likewise, 53% of Canadians traveling to 
the South in 1974 came during these winter 
months. Specifically, Florida received 62% of its 
1974 Canadian vacation visitors from December 
to March, with 28% coming during March. 



Month Trip Started 



Chart 25 

CANADIAN VACATION TRIPS 

TO THE U.S. IN 1974 
BY SEASONALITY (By Month) 

US. Mainland 
(Excludes 
Canada U.S. Islands) 



Januarys" 


-3%7 
-3%0 

3% J 




?%- 

w 

W 

n- 








February-" 








6% 




April — """" 


5% 


May " 

June"'""" 


9% 


9% 


July 


30% 


29% 


August 


22% 


22% 


September 


9% 


9% 


October 


8% 


9% 


November 






December 


4% 


4% 



Total US. 

(Includes 

US. Islands) 



6% 



5% 



9% 



6% 



4% 



7% 



19% 



17% 



7% 



9% 



5% 



6% 



4% 



5% 



9% 



5% 



5% 



20% 



17% 



10% 



5% 



4% 



5% 



5% 



19% 



16% 



7% 



9% 



4% 



6% 



(Base) (2235) (2274) 

1973 1974 

Note: Totals may not add to 100% due to rounding 



(741) 
1973 



(955) 
1974 



(1027) 
1974 



26 



Winter travel to the Frontier West was also 
popular— 44% of the Canadian visitors to that 
area arrived from December to March. 

Conversely, summer travel by Canadian vaca- 
tioners was especially prevalent among those 
traveling to the Northern and Eastern regions of 
the U.S. in 1974. Three-fourths (75%) of the 
Canadian visitors to New England came during 
the summer (June to September), and 70% of 
the travelers to the Eastern Gateway visited this 
region during this period in 1974. (See Ap- 
pendix III-M.) 

Canadian vacation travelers who visited the U.S. 
during the winter months (December to March) 
of 1974 also had the highest per capita trip 
expenditures ($405)— due likely to their longer 
distances traveled and consequential longer stays 
in the U.S. Those traveling to the U.S. during 
the summer season (June to September), on the 
other hand, had the lowest per capita trip 
expenditures-$ 182. 



E. Length of Stay 

The average length of stay of Canadian vacation 
travelers to the U.S. (including the U.S. Islands) 
was 11.5 nights in 1974. (The 11.5 nights only 
includes the actual time spent in the U.S. It does 
not include the nights spent on route to the 
U.S.). By way of comparison, Canadian domes- 
tic trips lasted 11.6 nights, while trips to all 
other countries averaged 23.2 nights. (See Ap- 
pendices III-O, III-P, and III-Q.) 

The average trip duration of Canadian vacation 
travelers to the U.S. Mainland was virtually 
unchanged from 1973 — an average of 11.7 
nights in 1973 and 11.3 nights in 1974. During 
1974, 33% of the Canadian trips to the U.S. 
Mainland lasted from 6 to 1 1 nights, while 31% 
lasted a relatively short period of from 1 to 5 
nights. Twenty-six percent of these trips were 
for a duration of from 12 to 23 nights on the 
U.S. Mainland. This was the same distribution as 
in 1973. (See Appendix III-R.) 

Mean lengths of stay of Canadians in the various 
U.S. regions ranged from a low 8.2 nights in 
New England to a high of 17.5 nights in the 



Chart 26 

CANADIAN VACATION TRIPS TO THE 
U.S. IN 1974 BY LENGTH OF STAY 



Number of Nights 
Spent at 
Destination 



Canada 



US. Mainland Total US. 
(Excludes (Includes 
U.S. Islands) US. Islands) 



1-3 Nights 
4-5 Nights 

6-11 Nights — 

12-23 Nights 

24 Nights 
and Over 

Don't Know/- 
Can't Remember 




18% 
14% 
30% 



17% 



14% 



33% 



26% 



9% 



1% 



20% 



12% 



33% 



26% 



9% 



2% 



16% 
15% 
33% 



26% 



)% 



1% 



16% 
14% 
32% 



28% 



8% 



(Base) (2235) (2274) (741) (955) (1027) 

Mean (Nights) NA 11.60 11.68 1126 11.46 

1973 1974 1973 1974 1974 

Note: Totals may not add to 100% due to rounding. 
*tessthan'/2 0f1% 

South. With respect to individual states, the 
longest mean trip duration was among Canadians 
traveling to Florida (18.6 nights), and the 
shortest length of stay was in Maine (7.5 nights). 
(See Appendix III-Q.) 

As might be expected, those Canadian vaca- 
tioners traveling to the U.S. who had the longer 
lengths of stay had the higher per capita trip 
expenditures — $432 for those who stayed 18 
nights and over and $103 for those staying 1-5 
nights in the U.S. in 1974. The daily expendi- 
tures of persons who stayed for 18 nights or 
more in the U.S., however, were considerably 
less ($13) than those who stayed 1 to 5 nights 
($31). Visitors who stayed 12 to 17 nights had a 
per capita trip expenditure of $373 and a daily 
per capita trip expenditure of $27. 

With respect to Canadian trips to all destina- 
tions, it appears there has been a slow but 
constant increase in the length of the trip. In 
1972, the average duration was 12.8 nights; in 
1973 it was 13.0 nights and in 1974, 13.2 
nights. (See Appendix III-P.) 



27 



597-433 O - 75 - 3 



IV. ATTITUDES TOWARD TRAVEL IN 
THE U.S. 

Canadian attitudes toward travel in the United 
States, compared to domestic travel within 
Canada, changed slightly from 1973. Canada has 
appeared to have re-enforced its traditional 
images of "interesting wilderness' 1 and "recrea- 
tional attractions" and to have less of a "re- 
moteness" perception. The U.S. appears to have 
strengthened its appeals of "entertainment," a 
"sense of freedom" when traveling there, warm 
weather, and educational advantages. 



Some of the improvement in the image of the 
U.S. could be attributable to the fact that at the 
time of the previous survey (December, 1973), 
with the threat of the "Energy Crisis," the U.S. 
could have been perceived as far less accessible 
with travel being inhibited at that time. 



There were some interesting differences re- 
gionally in attitudes toward the U.S. 

Atlantic Provinces' residents, for example, who 
had visited the U.S. felt strongly that Canada 
and the U.S., as vacation destinations, were 
dissimilar. In comparison to Canadian visitors to 
the U.S. from other provinces, these travelers 
were more impressed with the fact that the U.S. 
had better weather than the average visitor to the 
U.S. They were among the least impressed, 
however, by U.S. beaches and the availability of 
good family entertainment. 

On the other hand, visitors to the U.S. from 
Quebec felt strongly that the U.S. had better 
beaches and weather than were available in 
Canada. They also felt that the U.S. had more 
points of interest which were close to each 
other. 

Residents of the Prairie Provinces who had 
visited the U.S. felt that the U.S. had better 



TABLE 2 
ATTI DUDES TOWARD TRAVEL IIM THE UNITED STATES VS. CANADA, 1973-74 

Agree completely or strongly 



1973 



1974 



Did not Did not 

Visited visit Visited visit 

Total U.S.A. U.S.A. Total U.S.A. U.S.A. 



1. When I choose a vacation spot, I think of the place 
itself and don't especially consider whether it's in 
Canada or the U.S 

2. The weather in the U.S. is usually better for vacations 
than it is in Canada 

3. The U.S. still has better beaches than Canada does. . . 

4. A vacation in other provinces would involve having 
to travel greater distances between points of 
interest than one in the U.S 

5. To my mind, Canada is getting to be a better vacation 
spot than is the U.S 

6. Vacationing in the U.S. is almost like not being out 

of the country 



43% (50%) 37% 41% (46%) 37% 



23% ^28%> 18% 24% \28%/ 20% 

19% (23%) 14% 19% (24%) 15% 

20% (22%) 18% 18% (21%) 16% 



47% 40% 52% 42% (37%) 46% 



11% 15%) 20% 12% M6%J 9% 



28 



weather than Canada, but were relatively un- 
impressed by U.S. beaches. More so than U.S. 
visitors from the other Canadian provinces, 
Prairie-dwellers were inclined to agree that the 
U.S. offered better family entertainment than 
was available in Canada. 



British Columbia visitors displayed the highest 
propensity to agree that the U.S. offered more 
points of interest which were close to each 
other. 



TABLE 3 
FAVORABLE ATTITUDES TOWARDS TRAVEL IN THE UNITED STATES VS. CANADA, 1974 



Aspects of travel to the U.S. 



Visited the U.S. from: (Canadian Province) 

British 
Atlantic Quebec Ontario Prairies Columbia 



Better beaches 28% 

Better weather (54) 

Closer points of interest (less distance between) 43 

Better family entertainment 16 



31 

© 

41 
30 



26 

33 

(32 



34 

© 

51 
31 



29 



TECHNICAL INDEX 



31 



TECHNICAL INDEX 



I. DEFINITION OF UNITED STATES AND CANADIAN REGIONS 



U.S. REGIONS 



NEW ENGLAND 

Connecticut 
Maine 

Massachusetts 
New Hampshire 
Rhode Island 
Venn on t 

EASTERN GATEWAY 

New Jersey 
New York 

GEORGE WASHINGTON 
COUNTRY 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 

Maryland 

Pennsylvania 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

THE SOUTH 

Alabama 

Arkansas 

Florida 

Georgia 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Mississippi 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Tennessee 



5. GREAT LAKES 
COUNTRY 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Ohio 

Wisconsin 

6. OLD WEST 

Colorado 

Montana 

Nebraska 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Utah 

Wyoming 

7. FRONTIER WEST 

Arizona 

Kansas 

Missouri 

New Mexico 

Oklahoma 

Texas 

8. FAR WEST 

Alaska 

California 

Idaho 

Nevada 

Oregon 

Washington 



9. ISLANDS 

American Samoa 
Guam 
Hawaii 
Puerto Rico 
Virgin Islands 



CANADIAN REGIONS 

ATLANTIC PROVINCES 

Newfoundland 
Prince Edward Island 
Nova Scotia 
New Brunswick 

QUEBEC 

ONTARIO 

PRAIRIE PROVINCES 

Manitoba 

Saskatchewan 

Alberta 

BRITISH COLUMBIA 

OTHER 

Yukon/N.W.T. 



33 



II. DEFINITION OF TERMS 



III. METHODOLOGY 



The definitions used in the study were as 
follows: 

"Vacation" defined for the respondent as not 
including weekends or long weekends or statu- 
tory holidays; or "working holidays." Beyond 
this, the definition was intentionally left up to 
the respondent. This procedure was carefully 
established to avoid a long series of arbitrary 
decisions as to what was and what was not a 
vacation. For example, housewives, professional 
men, retired people and students would each 
have required explicit, arbitrary, and perhaps 
even inconsistent criteria laid down as to what 
constituted a vacation. Consequently, the defini- 
tion of a vacation was completely subjective 
(aside from the above list of what it was not): if 
the respondent thought he had a vacation, it was 
considered that he did. 

Vacation trip essentially is absence from home. 
Once again, the precise definition was the 
respondent's. In practice, virtually all trips re- 
ported were of at least one night's duration, and 
this can be taken as the working criterion. 

For analytical purposes a further definitional 
requirement of a "trip" was made, such that it 
was "a person or group of people from the same 
household traveling together." If husband and 
wife traveled together, it was deemed reasonable 
that this should be regarded as one trip, not two. 
For example, they would probably have made a 
single joint decision to go on the trip. If they 
went with a couple from another household, this 
second pair probably would have made a sepa- 
rate decision, so this foursome could be regarded 
as two trips. 

Since individuals (18 or over) were interviewed 
for these studies, the problem could arise of 
double counting (or multiple counting) of 
trips— for example, interviewing husband and 
wife who had been on a trip together would 
show two trips, not one. Weighting was used to 
compensate for this possibility. For each trip it 
was ascertained how many people (18 and over 
from the same household) had been on the trip. 
The reciprocal of this number served as the basis 
for this corrective weighting. 



This survey was conducted by Traveldata using a 
national probability sample including all but 7% 
of the entire Canadian population (i.e., persons 
mainly in institutions or in northern regions of 
the country). The data are based on 6,388 
personal interviews with individuals 18 years and 
over. Checkbacks were made with approxi- 
mately 20% of the interviews completed by each 
interviewer as a quality control measure. Details 
were recorded for up to three vacation trips per 
respondent to minimize seasonal bias. No more 
than one percent of the respondents took more 
than three such trips, so this survey represents 
virtually a complete sample of all vacation trips. 



IV. CANADIAN VACATION TRIPS VS. 
TOTAL ARRIVALS 

In 1974 the U.S. received 22% of the 7.5 million 
Canadian vacation trips. 

A conversion of percentage share to the number 
of trips and arrivals is as follows: 

Destination 1973 

Canada only 67% 5.0 million trips 

United States (Mainland) . . 22% 1.7 million trips 
Other Countries 11% 0.8 million trips 

Total 100% 7.7 million trips 

Destination 1974 

Canada only 66% 5.0 million trips 

United States (Mainland) . . 21% 1.5 million trips 
Other Countries 14% 1.0 million trips 

Total 100% 7.5 million trips 



Conversion of trips to arrivals for the U.S. 
(including the U.S. Islands) are as follows: (1.6 
million trips) (2.36 persons per trip) = 3.9 
million arrivals in 1974 compared to (1.7 million 
trips) (2.46 persons per trip) = 4.2 million 
arrivals in 1973. 

In 1974, international tourist arrivals numbered 
approximately 209.2 million, a decrease of 2.7% 



34 



from the previous year. During 1974, the U.S. 
received 14.1 million visitor arrivals (+1.2% over 
1973) or 6.7% of the total international tourist 
arrivals. Canadian arrivals to the U.S. in 1974 
numbered 8.7 million (—1.6% from 1973) and 
represented 61% of the total visitors to the U.S. 

TOTAL CANADIAN ARRIVALS 
IN THE U.S.. 1974 



Number of 

Canada 

Mexico 

Overseas 

Total 14/ 



arrivals 


8,664,619 
1,840,849 
3,617,579 



Percent 
of Total 

61% 

13% 
26% 

1 00% 



Based on the study Vacation Travel by Cana- 
dians in 1974, 1,644,000 Canadians took vaca- 
tion trips to the U.S. in 1973. There was an 
average of 2.36 persons on each trip which 
meant that there were 3,880,000 Canadian 
vacation arrivals to the U.S. in 1974. For 
comparative purposes, there were 3.6 million 
vacation arrivals on the U.S., mainland in 1974, 
a 13% decrease from the 3.2 million vacation 
arrivals on the U.S. mainland in 1973. 



The difference in the 8.7 million and the 3.9 
million arrivals described above are attributed to 
the definition of a Canadian visitor. The 8.7 
million arrivals represent total Canadian travel to 
the U.S. (including persons under 18 years and 
persons who traveled to the U.S. for other than 
vacation purposes), whereas the 3.9 million 
arrivals represent only Canadian vacation travel 
to the U.S. 

The information provided in this report, how- 
ever, pertains only to the 3.9 million Canadian 
vacation arrivals to the U.S. in 1974. 



V. VACATION TRIPS AND ARRIVALS IN 
U.S. REGIONS 



The proportion of Canadian vacations arrivals to 
the U.S. (3.9 million) by destination differs 
slightly from the proportion of vacation trips 
(1.5 million) because the latter does not take 
into account the number of persons on a trip. In 
addition, the proportion of Canadian arrivals in 
a specific, U.S. region differs depending on 
whether multiple trips are included or not. 



35 






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36 



APPENDICES 



37 



SECTION I 



CANADIAN VACATIONS AND TRIPS 



39 



I-A 



CANADIAN VACATION PATTERNS, 1966-74 



Percent of Canadian adults who take vacations in: 



Change 73 
1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 to 74 

% % % % % % % % % % 

Total 52 56 54 55 58 58 61 58 58 

Region: 

Atlantic Provinces 41 

Quebec 49 

Ontario 56 

Prairie Provinces 50 

British Columbia 59 



46 


38 


39 


46 


51 


44 


49 


42 


E 


49 


56 


55 


59 


55 


62 


55 


53 


-2 


61 


54 


59 


62 


61 


64 


60 


62 


+2 


58 


53 


51 


56 


58 


59 


60 


59 


-1 


65 


60 


60 


61 


66 


64 


68 


69 


+1 



41 



I-B 



CHARACTERISTICS OF CANADIANS WHO TAKE VACATION TRIPS 



Characteristics 



Percent of Canadian adults taking vacation trips 



1966 



1972 



1973 



1974 



Change '73 
to 74 

% 



Total adults 

Region: 

Atlantic Provinces 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Prairie Provinces . . 
British Columbia . 

Language: 

French Quebec . . . 
Rest of Canada . . , 

Socio-economic level: 

Upper 

Upper middle 

Middle 

Lower middle 
Lower 

Community size: 

Total urban 

Total rural 

Farm 

Non-farm . . . . 

Sex: 

Male 

Female 

Age: 

18-29 

30-39 

40-49 

50 and over 



46 



58 



56 



55 



-1 



37 


41 


48 


39 


a 


40 


57 


51 


48 


-3 


51 


61 


57 


59 


+2 


48 


57 


58 


57 


-1 


54 


61 


67 


(67) 


- 



38 
49 



55 
58 



49 
58 



45 
58 



-4 



60 


70 


70 


(71) 


+ 1 


49 


64 


65 


(61) 


-4 


43 


60 


55 


55 


- 


31 


55 


50 


48 


-2 


28 


42 


39 


39 


- 


51 


61 


59 


© 


-1 


34 


47 


45 


43 


-2 


28 


35 


42 


40 


-2 


36 


51 


47 


44 


-3 



46 


55 


54 


53 


-1 


47 


60 


57 


56 


-1 



58 


58 


55 


-3 


62 


61 


59 


-2 


61 


58 


55 


-3 


53 


49 


52 


+3 



42 



I-C 



VACATION TRAVEL PROJECTIONS 



1973 

# 



1974 

# 



Change 
1973/1974 

% 



Canadian population (18 +)* 

Took holidays 

Took vacation trip during holidays 



Total individual trips (higher than above due to multiple 
trip taking) 

Total "household trips"** 



Number of household trips staying overnight or longer in : 

Canada 

British Columbia 

Prairies 

Ontario 

Quebec 

Atlantic Provinces 



U.S. Mainland and U.S. Islands 
U.S. (Mainland) 



New England 

Eastern Gateway 

George Washington Country 

The South 

Great Lakes Country 

Old West 

Frontier West 

Far West 

U.S. not specified 



U.S. Islands . . . 
Other Countries. 



14,522,000 
8,463,000 
8,089,000 

11,970,000 
7,663,000 



845,000 



14,848,000 +2.2 

8,603,000 +1.7 

8,109,000 +0.2 



11,434,000 
7,458,000 



5,578,000 


5,326,000 


1,214,000 


1,244,000 


1,186,000 


1,103,000 


1,867,000 


1,904,000 


1,314,000 


1,213,000 


733,000 


576,000 


n.a. 


1,644,000 


1,697,000 


1,539,000 


355,000 


277,000 


321 ,000 


242 ,000 


128,000 


91,000 


405,000 


338,000 


243,000 


203,000 


112,000 


1 07 ,000 


46,000 


72,000 


357,000 


413,000 


n.a. 


24,000 



128,000 



899,000 



-4.5 



-2.7 



-4.5 



+2.5 
-7.0 
+2.0 
-7.7 
-21.4 



-9.3 



-22.0 
-24.6 
-28.9 
-16.6 
-16.5 
-4.5 
+56.5 
+ 15.7 




+21.5 



*Statistics Canada. 
**Determined by dividing the individual trips by the average number of adults on each trip who reside in the 
respondent's household. 



43 



597-433 O - 75 - 4 



I-D 



DESTINATIONS OF CANADIAN VACATION TRAVELERS, 1966-74 



Percent of total trips 



1966 

% 



1972 

% 



1973 

% 



Change '73 
1974 to 74 



0/ 

/o 



o/ 
/o 



Areas visited overnight or longer: 

Canada only 

Canada plus Other Countries. 

Newfoundland 

Prince Edward Island . . . 

Nova Scotia 

New Brunswick 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Manitoba 

Saskatchewan 

Alberta 

British Columbia 

Yukon/N.W.T 



United States (Mainland) 

New England 

Eastern Gateway 

George Washington Country 
The South Region 

Florida 

Great Lakes Region 

Old West 

Frontier West 

Far West 

California 

U.S. Mainland (unspecified) . 



Other Countries (including U.S. Islands) 



11 



14 



69 


71 


67 


66 


-1 


- 


77 


73 


71 


-2 


2 


1 


2 


1 


-2 


1 


2 


3 


2 


-1 


4 


4 


4 


3 


-1 


4 


4 


5 


4 


-1 


18 


19 


17 


16 


-1 


32 


29 


24 


26 ( 


+2 


5 


5 


5 


4 


-1 


7 


5 


5 


5 


- 


11 


9 


10 


10 


- 


14 


15 


16 


17 


+1 


* 


* 


1 


1 


- 


22 


19 


22 


21 


-1 


- 


4 


5 


4 


-1 


- 


5 


4 


3 


-1 


- 


2 


2 


1 


-1 


- 


4 


5 


5 


- 


- 


3 


5 


3 


-2 


- 


2 


3 


3 


- 


:} 


1 


w 


2 

1 


_ 


- 


4 


5 


6 


+ 1 


— 


3 


3 


3 


- 



+3 



'Non-resident" Canadian Province 



30 



32 



31 



Less than 1%. 
-Not available. 



44 



I-E 



DESTINATIONS OF CANADIAN VACATION TRAVELERS, BY PLACE OF RESIDENCE, 1973-74 

Percent of total trips 
Place of residence at time of trip 

Total Atlantic Saskat- British 

Canada Provinces Quebec Ontario Manitoba chewan Alberta Columbia 

■12_ 74 73 74 73 74 73 '74 73 74 73 74 73 74 73 74 

0/ 0/ 0/ 0/ 0/ 0/ 0/ 0/ 0/ 0/ 0/ 0/ 0/ 0/ 0/ 0/ 

/o /o /o /o /o /o /o /o /o /o /o /o /o /o /o /o 

Areas visited overnight or longer: 

Canada only 67 66 73 (83) 61 63 63 62 70 [5§] 85 |77J 81 [74] 70 70 

Canada, plus other countries 73 71 82 87 65 65 69 68 81 [§|] 97 94 86 84 74 76 

Newfoundland 2 1 12 9 11 1 1 

Prince Edward Island 321112 22 32 * - * 1 

Nova Scotia 43 22 21 22 43 32 11 12 1 

New Brunswick 5 4 22 22 5 4 5 4 2 2 1 1 1 1 * 1 

Quebec 17 16 13 12 47 50 12 [To] 4 4 6 1 2 3 2 1 

Ontario 24 26 14 (53) 12 11 48 48 17 15 13 12 4 7 6 5 

Manitoba 54 1 1 1 1 33 37J24]l510 44 4 3 

Saskatchewan 5 5 1 2 1 1 3 2 23 [20] 41 37 8 9 3 6 

Alberta 10 10 1 4 2 * 3 4 25 [7l] 32 (46) 42 34 14 15 

British Columbia 16 17 3 7 2 1 5 6 22 (T|] 20 (29) 43 42 56 58 

Yukon/N.W.T * 1 1 1 1 1 * * * - - 4 1 3 * 2 

U.S. Mainland and U.S. Islands - 22 - 12 - 26 - 22 - 28 - 21 - 21 - 24 

United States Mainland** 22 21 20 [TT| 26 25 24 [2l] 21 24 1 1 (20) 14 19 20 20 

New England 5 4 16 Q 12 10 3 3 - - - * - * 1 

Eastern Gateway 433*7664-1 1 1 

George Washington Country ..21 112232 11-1*11 

The South Region 5 5 4 3 5 4 9 7 3 4 3 3 1 3 

Florida 4 3 4 2 4 3 8 6 3 4 3 3 1 1 

Great Lakes Region 331*116581212**1 1 

Old West 2 2 * * * * 1 1 11 9 5 10 3 4 1 1 

Frontier West *1— — 11*121*2*2 1 

Far West 5 6 1 - 2 3 2 3 5 8 3 12 9 11 17 17 

California 33*-132234*3438 6 

U.S. mainland (Unspecified). . . **__1*«»--*_*11 1 

U.S. Islands 2 1114 12 4 

er Countries . . 

'Non-resident" 

* Less than 1%. 
**See Appendix for definition of U.S. Regions. 
—Not available. 
Example of how to read table: In 1974, 58% of the residents of Manitoba who took a vacation trip traveled in Canada only; 28% 
traveled to the U.S. and 17% took a trip to countries other than Canada or the U.S. 



Other Countries 




11 


12 


6 


7 


13 


12 


13 


© 


9 


© 


4 


3 


5 


7 


10 


11 


"Non-resident' 


Canadian Province . . 


- 


31 


55 


© 


21 


18 


25 


24 


61 


49 


67 


71 


55 


61 


24 


24 



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CO 


CD 


CO 


■ — 


*^ 



co *? r-~ co 

O CO ■- LO 

co ro cm «— 



co cm co o 
co ■* ro cm 

CM CM «- i- 



& LO <- 



I- CD <- «- 



a £ 



-Q 

E 



+3 <" 






53 



I-G 



CANDIAN VACATION TRAVEL TO MULTIPLE REGIONS IN THE UNITED STATES IN 1974 

BY DESTINATION 

NEW ENGLAND REGION EASTERN GATEWAY GEORGE 

TOTAL Massa- .„ K , K , WASH- 
AM New New 
Destination U.S. Total Maine chu- „ , Total ., , INGTON 

Other York Jersey __„„__„ 

setts COUNTRY 

New England 17% 100% 100% 100% 100% 11% 14% 2% 9% 

(Maine) 7 44 100 14 22 6 7 2 2 

(Massachusetts) 5 29 9 100 10 3 3 2 3 

(All other) 7 42 21 14 100 8 10 1 8 

Eastern Gateway 15 10 11 8 16 100 100 100 26 

(New York) 12 10 11 8 16 81 100 21 25 

(New Jersey) 4 * 1 2 1 24 6 100 6 

George Washington Country 6 3 2 3 6 10 11 9 100 

The South 21 1 1 3 2 4 5 3 19 

(Florida) 16 1 1 3 1 4 5 2 13 

(All other) 6 1 1 3 2 2 2 1 18 

Great Lakes Country 12 1 1 3 * 4 5 1 7 

Old West 7 * * * * 1 1 * 2 

Frontier West 4 * * * * 2 2 * 2 

Far West 25 * * * * 2 3 * 8 

(California) 11 * * * * 2 2 * 4 

(Washington) 10 * * * * 1 2 * 5 

(All other) 10 * * * * 2 3 * 4 

U.S. Mainland 93 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 

Islands Region 8 * * * * 1 1 * 1 

U.S. Unspecified 1 

Total U.S 116 115 115 117 124 135 142 115 174 

(Base) 1,027 173 76 51 73 151 123 36 57 

Note: Includes multiple answers. 

Example of how to read table: In 1974, 81% of the Canadian vacation trips to the Eastern Gateway were to New York. Ten 
percent of the vacation trips to the Eastern Gateway also included a visit to George Washington Country. 

The U.S. Mainland Category is included so that comparisons can be made between 1973 and 1974 data. 



54 



I-G-Con. 



CANADIAN VACATION THAVEL TO MULTIPLE REGIONS IN THE UNITED STATES IN 1974-Con. 

BY DESTINATION 



THE SOUTH 



GREAT FRON 

LAKES 0LD TIER 



FAR WEST 



Cah 



Wash 



Total Flonda A " COUNTRY WEST WEST Total forma in 9 
Other ton 



US. 

A li ISLANDS 



Other 



REGION 



U.S. 
MAIN 
LAND 



New England 1% 1% 3% 2% 

(Maine) 1 * 2 

(Massachusetts) 1 1 2 1 

(All other) 1 1 2 ....... 

Eastern Gateway 3 3 5 5 2 6 1 2 2 3 1 

(New York) 33452612231 

(New Jersey) 1 1 1 

George Washington Country ...5 4 16 3 2 3 2 2 3 2 1 

The South 100 100 100 16 6 17 2 4 3 3 4 

(Florida) 79 100 32 9 4 6 1 3 2 2 2 

(All other) 31 13 100 15 5 15 2 3 3 3 3 

Great Lakes Country 10 7 29 100 24 16 3 5 4 5 

OldWest 2 1 5 13 100 14 11 10 16 18 

Frontier West 4 2 11 6 91 00 5 7 6 9 

Far West 3 2 7 7 43 30 100 100 100 100 5 

(California) 2 2 5 5 17 17 42 100 11 22 2 

(Washington) 2 1 4 3 23 13 38 10 100 27 3 

(All other) 2 1 4 4 27 20 40 20 28 100 

U.S. Mainland 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 10 

Islands Region 2 1 4 2 2 3 100 

U.S. Unspecified 

Total 130 121 180 152 186 186 126 132 137 140 111 

(Base) 211 167 65 



18% 
8 
5 

8 

16 
13 

4 



22 

18 

7 

13 

7 

5 

27 
11 
10 
11 

100 



2 
116 
955 



55 



PROJECTED EXPENDITURES 



I-H 



1973 



1974 



Percentage 
increase 



Vacation expenditures by Canadians: 
Total 



2,057,000,000 2,392,000,000 



+16.2 



Total vacation expenditures by Canadian spending 
one or more nights in: 

Canada 

Atlantic Provinces 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Prairie Provinces 

British Columbia 

Other Countries 



994,000,000 


1,156,000,000 


( + 16.2 


202,000,000 


161,000,000 


-20.3 


269,000,000 


243,000,000 


-9.7 


377,000,000 


369,000,000 


-2.2 


268,000,000 


307,000,000 


+ 14.5 


259,000,000 


356,000,000 


+37.5 



754,000,000 890,000,000 



+ 18.0 



Total U.S. expenditures by Canadians spending 
one or more nights in: 

U S. Mainland and U.S. Islands 

U.S. (Mainland only) 

New England 

Eastern Gateway 

New York State 

George Washington Country 

The South 

Florida 

Great Lakes Country 

Old West 

Frontier West 

Far West 

California 

U.S. not specified 

U.S. Islands 



— 


631,338,000 




483,000,000 


540,000,000 


(+11.8 


76,000,000 


55,000,000 


-27.6 


70,000,000 


66,000,000 


-5.7 


58,000,000 


50,000,000 


-13.8 


*47,000,000 


32,000,000 


-31.9 


171,000,000 


198,000,000 


+ 15.8 


160,000,000 


165,000,000 


+3.1 


62,000,000 


55,000,000 


-11.3 


* 2 6,000 ,000 


34,000,000 


+30.8 


*24,000,000 


36,000,000 


+50.0 


131,000,000 


162,000,000 


+23.7 


104,000,000 


97,000,000 


-6.7 


n.a. 


6,000,000 


— 


n.a. 


109,000,000 


- 



*Data should be interpreted with caution as base was small. 



56 



I-I 

APPENDIX 



CANADIAN VACATION PARTY EXPENDITURES, 1973-74 



Average expenditure per vacation party 
Per trip Per day 



1973 1974 1973 1974 



Areas visited overnight or longer : 

Total 

Total Canada 

Atlantic Provinces 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Manitoba 

Saskatchewan 

Alberta 

British Columbia 

U.S.A. (Mainland)* 

All other countries 



396 


(479) 


31 


36 


261 


312 


23 


27 


379 


403 


29 


32 


313 


307 


25 


27 


298 


291 


24 


25 


489 


481 


24 


23 


444 


421 

> — V 


24 


25 


314 


(445) 


24 


31 


302 


w 


23 


28 


508 


(616) 


37 


44 


1,242 


1,373 


43 


59 



* Includes expenditures made while traveling to and from the U.S. The amount actually spent in the U.S. per vaca- 
tion party was $438 in 1973 and $570 in 1974. 



57 



I-J 



CANADIAN VACATION TRAVEL TO THE UNITED STATES IN 1974 
BY PLACE OF RESIDENCE OF AIR VISITORS 

C 

land) 

"Less than 1/2 of 1%. 
Note. The U.S. Mainland category is included so that comparison can be made between 1973 and 1974 data. 













THE SOUTH 


FAR WEST 








CANADA 


EUROPE 


CARIB 
BEAN 


TOTAL 
U.S. 










U.S. 
ISLANDS 


U s 










Cali- 


MAIN- 










Total 


Florida 


Total 


for- 


REGION 


LAND 


















nia 






Residence (air visitors). 






















Atlantic Provinces 


15% 


6% 
(1) 


1% 
(1) 


5% 
(1) 


7% 


4% 


_ 


: 


2% 


6% 


(New Foundland) 


(4) 


(2) 


(Prince Edward Island) 


(2) 


(1) 


- 


(*) 


(D 


- 


- 


- 


- 


(*) 


(Nova Scotia) 


(5) 


(4) 


- 


(3) 
(1) 


(3) 
(1) 


(3) 
(1) 


- 


- 


(2) 


(3) 


(New Brunswick) 


(4) 


(1) 


Quebec 


11 


17 

(4) 


27 

(11) 


19 

(5) 


25 

(3) 


24 

(3) 


20 

(5) 


27 

(8) 


13 
(8) 


21 


(English) 


(3) 


(4) 


(French) 


(6) 


(7) 


(17) 


(12) 


(21) 


(21) 


(11) 


(15) 


(4) 


(13) 


Ontario 


32 


57 

13 

(9) 
(1) 
(3) 

6 
2 


69 
1 

1 

1 


40 

16 

(5) 
(3) 
(8) 

19 

1 


57 

11 

(4) 
(4) 
(4) 


59 

12 

(4) 
(4) 
(4) 


22 

25 

(8) 

(5) 

(12) 

32 

1 


27 

17 

(6) 
(4) 
(6) 

27 
2 


21 

25 

(13) 

(2) 

(10) 

38 
1 


43 


Prairies 


24 


15 


(Manitoba) 


(5) 


(4) 


(Saskatchewan) 


(6) 


(3) 


(Alberta) 


... (13) 


(8) 


British Columbia 


19 


14 


All Other 


- 


1 


Total 


1 00 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


(Base) 


460 


199 


77 


270 


73 


68 


76 


53 


49 


226 









58 



CANADIAN VACATION TRAVEL TO THE UNITED STATES IN 1974 
BY PLACE OF RESIDENCE OF AUTO VISITORS 



I-K 



CANADA 



TOTAL 
U.S. 



NEW ENGLAND 


EASTERN 




REGION 


GATEWAY 








" litUnbt 






WASH- 


Total Maine 


_ New 
Total v^u 


INGTON 
COUNTRY 



Residence (auto visitors) : 

Atlantic Provinces 7% 3% 10% 12% '4% 

(New Foundland) (1) 

(Prince Edward Island) (*) 

(Nova Scotia) (3) (2) (4) (6) (4) 

(New Brunswick) (2) ( 1 ) (4) (6) 

Quebec 22 30 66 65 45 35 38 

(English) (2) (6) (13) (6) (11) (9) (4) 

(French) (19) (20) (48) (55) (30) (22) (21 ) 

Ontario 40 39 23 22 53 63 54 

Prairies 17 17 1 2 2 4 

(Manitoba) (4) (5) 

(Saskatchewan) (5) (5) (4) 

(Alberta) (8) (7) 

British Columbia 14 11 

AllOther 

Total 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 

(Base) 1,546 355 91 51 56 46 25 

Note: The U.S. Mainland category is included so that comparison can be made between 1973 and 1974 data. 
* Less than 1/2 of 1%. 



59 



597-433 O - 75 - 5 



I-K-Con. 



CANADIAN VACATION TRAVEL TO THE UNITED STATES IN 1974-Con. 
BY PLACE OF RESIDENCE OF AUTO VISITORS 



THE SOUTH 

GREAT 

LAKES 

Total Florida COUNTRY 



FAR WEST 



OLD 
WEST 



Total 



U.S. 

Wash- MAIN- 

ing- LAND 
ton 



Residence (auto visitors) : 

Atlantic Provinces 2% 

(New Foundland) - 

(Prince Edward Island) - 

(Nova Scotia) (2) 

(New Brunswick) - 

Quebec 19 

(English) (2) 

(French) (16) 

Ontario 77 

Prairies 2 

(Manitoba) 

(Saskatchewan) (2) 

(Alberta) 

British Columbia - 

All Other 

Total 100 

Base 43 



3% 



79 



(3) 



69 



10 



14 



43 



15 



47 



3% 



(3) 


- 


- 


- 


- 


(1) 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


(1) 


15 


3 


2 


6 


2 


30 


(3) 


(2) 


(2) 


(1) 


(2) 


(6) 


(9) 


- 


- 


(4) 


- 


(21) 



38 



26 


81 


36 


36 


17 


(19) 


(31) 


(5) 


(2) 


(6) 


(3) 


(26) 


(12) 


(13) 


(5) 


(2) 


(24) 


(19) 


(22) 


(7) 



11 



100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


33 


62 


43 


84 


55 


350 



60 



SECTION II 



TRAVELER CHARACTERISTICS 



61 



CANADIAN VACATION TRAVEL TO THE UNITED STATES IN 1974 
BY PLACE OF RESIDENCE 



II-A 



CANADA EUROPE 



CARIB TOTAL 



BEAN 



U.S. 



NEW ENGLAND REGION 



Massa- 

Total Maine chu- 

setts 



All 



EASTERN GATEWAY 



New 



New 



GEORGE 

WASH 



Total INGTON 

Other York Jersey COUNTRY 



Place of residence: 

Atlantic Provinces 8 5 

(Newfoundland) (1) (*) 

(Prince Edward Island) (1) (1) 

(Nova Scotia) (3) (4) 

(New Brunswick) .... (3) 

Quebec 20 17 

Ontario 38 55 

Prairie Provinces 19 13 

(Manitoba) (5) (8) 

(Saskatchewan) (5) (1) 

(Alberta) (9) (4) 

British Columbia 15 6 

Other 4 

Total 100 100 

(Base) 2,274 209 



27 

69 
2 



(2) 
1 

100 

78 



4 
(*) 
(*) 
(2) 
(1) 
25 
39 
'15 
(5) 
(3) 
(7) 
16 

1 

100 
1,027 



15 
(2) 
(*) 
(8) 
(5) 
57 
25 
2 

(1) 

(1) 

1 

100 
173 



12 
(1) 

(7) 
(4) 
68 
19 

1 

(1) 



100 

76 



34 

(3) 
(1) 
(23) 
(7) 
36 
28 
2 



(?) 

100 

51 



7 
(2) 
(1) 
(2) 
(2) 
54 
35 

2 

(1) 

(1) 



100 

73 



46 

47 

2 

(1) 

(1) 



100 
151 



36 

56 

3 

(1) 
(1) 



100 
123 



86 
14 



100 

36 



5 
(4) 

(1) 

38 
47 

8 
(4) 
(2) 
(2) 

2 

100 

57 







THE SOUTH 












FAR WEST 
















GREAT 


OLD 
WEST 


FRONT- 










U.S. 


U.S. 
















All 
other 


LAKES 


TIER 




Cali- 


Wash- 


All 
other 


ISLANDS 


MAIN- 




Total 


Florida 


COUNTRY 


WEST 


Total 


for- 
nia 


ing 
ton 


REGION 


LAND 


Place of residence: 


























Atlantic Provinces 


3 


3 


3 


* 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


4 


(Newfoundland) 


(*) 


(*) 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


(1) 


(Prince Edward Island) 


1 


- 


(2) 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


(*) 


(Nova Scotia) 


(1) 


(2) 


(1) 


(*) 


(1) 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


(2) 


(2) 


(New Brunswick) .... 


(1) 


(1) 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


(1) 


(1) 


Quebec 


22 


23 


19 


5 


2 


7 


9 


17 


2 


3 


9 


27 


Ontario 


67 

8 


66 

7 


63 

15 


67 
25 


12 
75 


61 
24 


17 
28 


23 
24 


10 
40 


17 
28 


29 
22 


40 


Prairie Provinces 


15 


(Manitoba) 


(3) 
(2) 


(3) 
(2) 


(6) 

(3) 


(19) 

(2) 


(26) 
(24) 


(6) 
(5) 


(7) 
(6) 


(9) 
(4) 


(6) 
(10) 


(5) 
(6) 


(9) 
(2) 


(5) 


(Saskatchewan) 


(3) 


(Alberta) 


(3) 


(2) 


(6) 


(4) 
3 


(25) 
10 


(13) 
5 


(15) 
45 


(11) 
34 


(24) 
48 


(17) 
52 


(10) 
36 


(7) 


British Columbia 


14 


Other 


* 


1 


* 


- 


- 


3 


1 


2 


* 


* 


1 


* 


Total 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


(Base) 


211 


167 


65 


127 


67 


45 


258 


109 


99 


103 


80 


955 







'Less than 1/2 of 1%. 

Note: The U.S. Mainland category is included so that comparisons can be made between 1973 and 1974 data. 
Example of how to read table: In 1974, 34% of the Canadians who vacationed in Massachusetts resided in the Atlantic Provinces. 



63 



II-B 



DESTINATIONS OF CANADIAN VACATION TRAVELERS BY CITY OF RESIDENCE, 1974 











Percent of trips 


ay 


residents of 










Total 


Vancouver 


Calgary/ 
Edmonton 


Winnipeg 


Toronto 




Montreal 




Total 


English 


French 




% 


% 


% 


% 




/o 


% 


0/ 

/o 


% 


Areas visited overnight or longer: 




















Canada: 




















Canada only 


66 


65 


62 




50 


H 


55 




50 


68 


Canada plus other 




















countries 


71 


70 


82 




HE 

© 


22 


58 




54 


70 


United States (Mainland) . . . 


21 


22 


20 




26 


@ 


I 20 


New England 


4 




1 






4 


7 


10 


5 


Eastern Gateway 


3 


2 






2 


5 


7 


6 


4 


George Washington 




















Country 


1 




* 




2 


1 


2 


1 


1 


South Region 


5 


. 


4 




6 


6 


5 


3 


5 


Great Lakes Region .... 


3 


1 






11 


4 


1 


1 






Old West 


2 
1 
6 

14 


1 

* 

19 
13 


4 

3 

12 

8 




10 

1 

10 

(§ 

3 


1 
3 

© 

1 


* 

1 

4 

19 


1 
1 
3 

@ 
3 


* 


Frontier West 


1 


Far West 


4 


Other Countries 


I 12 


U.S. Islands 


2 


5 


2 




1 




Europe 


7 


3 


4 




© © 


8 


8 


4 


Caribbean/Bermuda .... 


3 


* 


1 




- 


6 


5 


8 


4 




Other 


3 


5 


3 




7 


4 


6 


6 


5 




Non-ResidentProvince 


31 


24 


59 




44 


26 


22 


38 


16 



64 



II-C 



CANADIAN VACATION TRAVEL TO THE UNITED STATES IN 1974 
CITY OF RESIDENCE 



CANADA EUROPE 



CARIB- 
BEAN 



TOTAL 
U.S. 



NEW ENGLAND REGION 



Total 



Massa- 
chu- 
setts 



All 
Other 



EASTERN 
GATEWAY 



Total 



New 
York 



GE0R r 
WASH- 
INGTON 
COUNTRY 



City of residence: 

Vancouver 7 3 

Calgary/Edmonton 6 3 

Winnipeq 2 8 

Toronto 13 32 

Montreal 9 13 

(English) (2) (4) 

(French) (6) (3) 

(Other) (*) (6) 

Other 63 41 

Total 100 100 

(Base) 2,274 209 



1 


9 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


5 


- 


1 


5 


1 


- 


3 


- 


- 


- 


? 


- 


4 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


3 


5 


38 


16 


17 


10 


18 


23 


27 


31 


17 


21 


13 


20 


15 


24 


21 


24 


20 


17 


(10) 


(4) 


(8) 


(4) 


(12) 


(13) 


(6) 


(5) 


(2) 


(10) 


(6) 


(9) 


(10) 


(6) 


(8) 


(9) 


(4) 


(7) 


- 


(4) 


(3) 


(4) 


(6) 


(2) 


(10) 


(11) 


(7) 


41 


53 


62 


75 


55 


56 


43 


41 


59 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


78 


702 


118 


52 


33 


48 


94 


80 


42 



THE SOUTH FAR WEST 

GREAT FR0N- 

All LAKES WEST T ' ER Cali ' WaSh " Al 

Total Florida _ u COUNTRY WEST Total for- ing- „, 

Other 3 Other 

ma ton 

City of residence: 

Vancouver 2 4 3 25 20 18 30 

Calgary/Edmonton 4 3 9 14 16 12 9 15 17 

Winnipeq 4 6 6 11 20 3 5 9 5 4 

Toronto 20 25 9 24 13 8 14 4 7 

Montreal 11 13 6 5 2 6 8 16 1 1 

(English) (2) (3) (2) (1) (2) (3) (2) (2) (1) 

(French) (8) (9) (2) (3) (4) (9) (1) 

(Other) (2) (1) (4) (3) (2) (5) 

Other 61 54 70 58 60 59 42 32 57 41 

Total 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 

(Base) 142 109 47 88 50 31 186 81 73 71 

Less than 1/2 of 1%. 

Note: Data of limited value due to small sample sizes. 

The U.S. Mainland category is included so that comparison can be made between 1 973 and 1974 data. 



U.S. 
ISLANDS 
REGION 



U.S. 
MAIN- 
LAND 



24 
6 
6 

10 
6 

(6) 



48 

100 

51 



5 
4 
17 
14 
(4) 
(6) 
(4) 
52 

100 
657 



65 



II-D 
CANADIAN VACATION TRIPS TO THE U.S. BY DESTINATION (1974) 

Atlantic Prairie British Total 

Destination: Provinces Quebec Ontario Provinces Columbia Canada 

Total U.S 113% 106% 120% 134% 104% 116% 

New England 68 38 11 1 1 17 

(Maine) (24) (20) (3) (1) (7) 

(Massachusetts) (45) (7) (3) (1) (5) 

(All Other) (13) (15) (6) (1) (1) (7) 

Eastern Gateway 5 27 18 2 3 15 

(New York) (5) (17) (17) (2) (3) (12) 

(New Jersey) (12) (1) - (4) 

George Washington Country 8 8 7 3 1 6 

South 18 18 35 11 21 

(Florida) (16) (15) (27) (8) (16) 

(All Other South) (5) (5) (10) (6) (6) 

Great Lakes Country 3 2 21 20 2 12 

Old West 3 * 2 32 4 7 

Frontier West 1 7 7 1 4 

Far West 9 11 46 72 25 

(California) (7) (6) (16) (23) (11) 

(Washington) (*) (2) (25) (30) (10) 

(All Other Far West) (1) (4) (18) (33) (10) 

Total U.S. Mainland 92 98 95 92 83 93 

U.S. Islands 8 3 6 11 17 8 

U.S. Unspecified * 2 1 3 1 

((BASE) (38) (259) (405) (158) (162) (1,027) 

Note: Includes multiple destinations. 
* Less than 1/2 of 1%. 

How to read this chart: reading down, 68% of Atlantic Provinces residences visiting the U.S. came to the New England Region; 

5% went to the Eastern Gateway Region; 8% went to George Washington Country, etc. 



66 



II-E 



CANADIAN VACATION TRAVEL TO THE UNITED STATES IN 1974 
BY SIZE OF CITY OF RESIDENCE 



NEWENGLAND REGION 



EASTERN GATEWAY 



GEORGE 

CARIB- TOTAL WASH- 

BEAN U.S. T ., a " All , New New INGTON 

Total Maine chu- _ , Total ., „«....-,„«, 

Other York Jersey COUNTRY 

setts 



CANADA EUROPE 



City size: 

Over 500,000 .. . 34% 58% 62% 46% 43% 35% 42% 51% 61% 62% 54% 52% 

100,000 to 

500,000 19 18 15 16 14 13 22 10 

30,000 to 
100,000 10 6 11 9 7 11 7 6 

10,000 to 
30,000 4 5 3 5 8 10 6 5 

1 ,000 to 
10,000 10 5 9 11 14 15 11 12 

Under 10,000 .. . 23 8 13 14 16 12 16 

Total 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 

(Base) 2,274 209 78 1,027 173 76 51 73 



11 



6 

12 

100 
151 



12 



6 

10 

100 
123 



17 

8 

4 

14 

100 

36 



10 



16 



12 
7 

100 
57 





THE SOUTH 




GREAT 


OLD 
WEST 


FRON- 




FAR WEST 




U.S. 




















U.S. 




Total 


Florida 


All 
Other 


LAKES 
COUNTRY 


TIER 
WEST 


Total 


Cali- 
for- 
nia 


Wash- 
ing- 
ton 


All 
Other 


ISLANDS 
REGION 


MAIN- 
LAND 


City size: 


























Over 500,000 . . 


41% 


46% 


29% 


41% 


23% 


29% 


48% 


57% 


31% 


46% 


48% 


46% 


100,000 to 


























500,000 


21 


15 


32 


13 


33 


21 


19 


20 


22 


17 


17 


16 


30,000 to 


























100,000 


12 


12 


12 


11 


7 


22 


5 


4 


6 


5 


9 


10 


10,000 to 


























30,000 


4 


4 


4 


6 


4 


2 


7 


4 


11 


6 


4 


6 


1 ,000 to 


























10,000 


10 


10 


7 


13 


12 


16 


10 


6 


14 


13 


11 


11 


Under 10,000 . . 


12 


13 


16 


16 


21 


10 


11 


9 


16 


13 


11 


11 


Total 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


(Base) 


211 


167 


65 


127 


67 


45 


258 


109 


99 


103 


80 


955 



67 



CANADIAN VACATION TRAVEL TO THE UNITED STATES IN 1974 
BY URBAN/RURAL RESIDENCE 



II-F 



CANADA EUROPE 



CARIB TOTAL 



BEAN 



U.S. 



NEWENGLAND REGION 



Total Maine 



Massa- 
chu- 
setts 



All 
Other 



EASTERN GATEWAY 



Total 



New 



New 



York Jersey 



GEORGE 
WASH- 
INGTON 
COUNTRY 



Urban vs. rural : 

Urban 82% 

Rural 18 

(Farm) (4) 

(Non-farm)... (14) 

Total 100 

(Base) 2,274 



92% 


99% 


87% 


86% 


84% 


87% 


85% 


89% 


90% 


86% 


93% 


8 


1 


13 


14 


16 


13 


15 


11 


10 


14 


7 


(3) 


(*) 


(3) 


(2) 


(1) 


(1) 


(5) 


(5) 


(5) 


(6) 


(2) 


(5) 


(1) 


(9) 


(12) 


(15) 


(12) 


(10) 


(7) 


(6) 


(9) 


(6) 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


209 


78 


1,027 


173 


76 


51 


73 


151 


123 


36 


57 



THE SOUTH FAR WEST 

GREAT FRON- U.S. 

All LAKES WEST T ' ER Ca "- Wash ' All ' SLANDS 

Total Florida " COUNTRY WEST Total for- ing- ™ REGION 

Other y Other 

ma ton 

Urban vs. rural: 

Urban 87% 87% 84% 84% 80% 90% 89% 90% 84% 86% 89% 

Rural 13 13 16 16 20 10 11 10 16 14 11 

(Farm) (4) (3) (7) (7) (8) (7) (3) (2) (4) (4) (2) 

(Non-farm)... (9) (10) (9) (9) (12) (3) (8) (8) (12) (9) (9) 

Total 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 

(Base) 211 167 65 127 67 45 258 109 99 103 80 

'Less than 1/2 of 1%. 

Note: The U.S. Mainland category is included so that comparisons can be made between 1973 and 1974 data. 



U.S. 
MAIN- 
LAND 



87% 
13 
(3) 
(9) 

100 
955 



68 



II-G 



CANADIAN VACATION TRAVEL TO THE UNITED STATES IN 1974 
BY LANGUAGE SPOKEN 



CANADA EUROPE 



CARIB TOTAL 



BEAM 



U.S. 



NEW ENGLAND REGION 



Total 



Massa- 

laine chu- 

setts 



EASTERN GATEWAY 



GEORGE 
WASH- 
AM New New INGTON 
Other York Jersey COUNTRY 



16 



16 



40 



54 



1/ 



34 



26 



16 



63 



Language spoken: 

English 70% 57% 81% 68% 53% 41% 72% 63% 52% 60% 21% 

French 

(Quebec) 17 

French 

(Non-Quebec). . . 4 

Other 9 

Total 100 

(Base) 2,274 



48% 



25 



7 


— 


1 


2 


* 


5 


2 


* 


*' 


— 


1 


30 


3 


15 


5 


5 


7 


1 


21 


24 


16 


27 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


209 


78 


1,027 


173 


76 


51 


73 


151 


123 


36 


57 



THES0U ™ GREAT QLD FRON- ™™*I U.S. 

LAKES WEST T.ER ISLANDS 

All COUNTRY WEST T * All REGION 

Total Florida _ , Total for- inq- _ 

Other a Other 

ma ton 

Language spoken: 

English 67% 65% 69% 74% 82% 79% 82% 70% 88% 90% 83% 

French 

(Quebec) 16 17 10 1 1 6 5 9 1 1 4 

French 

(Non-Quebec)... 2 15 11 111 2 

Other 16 17 17 24 16 15 12 20 11 9 12 

Total 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 

(Base) 211 167 65 127 67 45 258 109 99 103 80 

* Less than 1/2 of 1%. 
Note: Totals may not add to 100% due to rounding. 

The U.S. Mainland category is included so that comparisons can be made between 1973 and 1974 data. 



U.S. 
MAIN- 
LAND 



67% 

17 

1 
15 

100 

955 



69 



CANADIAN VACATION TRAVEL TO THE UNITED STATES IN 1974 
BY DWELLING OWNERSHIP 



II-H 



NEW ENGLAND REGION 



CANADA EUROPE 



CARIB- TOTAL 



BEAN 



U.S. 



Massa- 
Total Maine chu- 
setts 



All 

Other 



EASTERN GATEWAY GEORGE 
WASH- 

New New INGT0N 
T ° tal York Jersey C0UNTRY 



45% 


56% 


53 


44 


2 


- 


100 


100 


36 


57 



Tenant vs. owner: 

Owner 63% 48% 55% 62% 60% 64% 54% 59% 51% 50% 

Tenant 36 52 45 37 39 36 46 38 47 47 

Not stated 1 1 - 1 1 - 3 2 2 

Total 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 

(Base) 2,274 209 78 1,027 173 76 51 73 151 123 

'Less than 1/2 of 1%. 

Note: Totals may not add to 100% due to rounding. 

The U.S. Mainland category is included so that comparisons can be made between 1973 and 1974 data. 





THE SOUTH 




GREAT 


OLD 

WEST 


FRON- 




FAR WEST 




U.S. 




















U.S. 








All 


LAKES 


TIER 




Cali- 


Wash- 


All 
Other 


ISLANDS 


MAIN- 




Total 


Florida 


Other 


COUNTRY 


WEST 


Total 


for- 


ing- 


REGION 


LAND 


















nia 


ton 








Tenant vs. owner: 


























Owner 


62% 


65% 


50% 


70% 


75% 


68% 


63% 


54% 


69% 


72% 


67% 


61% 


Tenant 


38 


35 


50 


30 


24 


32 


36 


44 


31 


28 


30 


38 


Not stated 


* 


* 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


2 


- 


* 


3 


1 


Total 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


(Base) 


211 


167 


65 


127 


67 


45 


258 


109 


99 


103 


80 


955 



70 



CANADIAN VACATION TRAVEL TO THE UNITED STATES IN 1974 
BY TYPE OF DWELLING OCCUPIED 



II-I 



CANADA EUROPE 



CARIB- TOTAL 



BEAN 



U.S. 



NEW ENGLAND REGION 



Total 



Massa- 
chu- 
setts 



All 
Other 



EASTERN GATEWAY 



Total 



New 

York Jersey 



GEORGE 
WASH- 

New ,NGT0N 
COUNTRY 



Type of dwelling: 

Single/Semi- 
detached 68% 53% 

Row house 11 12 

Apartment 18 29 

Other 3 7 

Total 100 100 

(Base) 2,274 209 



56% 


65% 


58% 


60% 


56% 


59% 


52% 


52% 


39% 


61% 


12 


12 


18 


26 


8 


15 


19 


15 


37 


13 


24 


21 


23 


14 


35 


25 


28 


32 


23 


26 


8 


2 


1 


* 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


- 


00 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


78 


1,027 


173 


76 


51 


73 


151 


123 


36 


57 





THE SOUTH 




GREAT 


OLD 
WEST 


FRON- 




FAR WEST 




U.S. 




















U.S. 








All 
Other 


LAKES 


TIER 




Cali- 


Wash- 


All 
Other 


ISLANDS 


MAIN- 




Total 


Florida 


COUNTRY 


WEST 


Total 


for- 
nia 


ing- 
ton 


REGION 


LAND 


Type of dwelling: 


























Single/Semi- 
detached 


64% 


62% 


65% 


72% 


81% 


75% 


71% 


63% 


78% 


76% 


69% 


65% 


Row house .... 


14 


15 


8 


6 


6 


5 


6 


7 


5 


6 


8 


13 


Apartment .... 


20 


21 


23 


18 


9 


19 


20 


28 


16 


17 


22 


21 


Other 


2 


2 


4 


3 


5 


1 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


Total 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


(Base) 


211 


167 


65 


127 


67 


45 


258 


109 


99 


103 


80 


955 



"Less than 1/2 of 1%. 
Note: Totals may not add to 100% due to rounding. 

The U.S. Mainland category is included so that comparisons can be made between 1973 and 1974 data. 



71 



II-J 



CANADIAN VACATION TRAVEL TO THE UNITED STATES IN 1974 

BY SEX 



NEW ENGLAND REGION 



CANADA EUROPE 



CARIB- TOTAL 
BEAN U.S. 



Total 



Ivlassa- 
1aine chu- 
setts 



EASTERN GATEWAY GEORGE 

WASH- 
AM _ New New .. lrTnll 
Total w , INGTON 
Other York Jersey rniiNTRY 



52% 
48 

100 

57 



Sex : 

Male 48% 49% 44% 46% 42% 47% 46% 45% 55% 54% 57% 

Female 52 51 56 54 58 53 54 55 45 46 43 

Total 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 

(Base) 2,274 209 78 1,027 173 76 51 73 151 123 36 

Total 

46') 

54 

1 00 

211 

Note: The U.S. Mainland category is included so that comparisons can be made between 1973 and 1974 data. 







THE SOUTH 










FAR WEST 
















GREAT 




FRON- 










U.S. 


U.S. 




Total 


Florida 


All 
Other 


LAKES 
COUNTRY 


OLD 
WEST 


TIER 
WEST 


Total 


Cali- 
for- 
nia 


Wash- 
ing- 
ton 


All 
Other 


ISLANDS 
REGION 


MAIN- 
LAND 


Sex: 

Male 


46% 


46% 
54 


51% 
49 


46% 
54 


49% 
51 


54% 
46 


45% 
55 


41% 
59 


54% 
46 


44% 
56 


55% 
45 


46% 


Female 


54 


54 


Total 


... 1 00 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


(Base) 


211 


167 


65 


127 


67 


45 


258 


109 


99 


103 


80 


955 



72 



II-K 



CANADIAN VACATION TRAVEL TO THE UNITED STATES IN 1974 

BY AGE 



CANADA EUROPE 



NEW ENGLAND REGION EASTERN GATEWAY GE0 RGE 

CARIB- TOTAL Massa- 

Total Maine chu- 
setts 



BEAN 



U.S. 



WASH- 
AM New New i«,n-rn»i 
Total v , INGTON 
Other York Jersey rnUNTRY 



Age: 



18-29 years . 
30-39 years . 
40-49 years . 
50 years and 



36% 


31% 


30% 


30% 


31% 


32% 


35% 


26% 


30% 


30% 


35% 


31% 


18 


17 


31 


19 


21 


27 


19 


23 


25 


22 


30 


24 


16 


26 


22 


20 


20 


16 


21 


19 


19 


21 


7 


13 



29 



25 



17 



31 



28 



25 



26 



32 



26 



27 



28 



33 



Total 
(Base) 



100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 

2,274 209 78 1,027 173 76 51 73 151 123 36 57 





THE SOUTH 




GREAT 


OLD 
WEST 


FRON- 




FAR WEST 




U.S. 


U.S. 




















Total 


Florida 


All 
Other 


LAKES 
COUNTRY 


TIER 
WEST 


Total 


Cali- 
for- 
nia 


Wash- 
ing 
ton 


All 
Other 


ISLANDS 
REGION 


MAIN- 
LAND 


Age: 


























18-29 years 


27% 


24% 


37% 


32% 


35% 


26% 


28% 


26% 


37% 


24% 


33% 


30% 


30-39 years . . . . 


16 


15 


20 


12 


24 


19 


21 


21 


23 


22 


19 


19 


40-49 years 


17 


17 


13 


19 


12 


19 


23 


21 


18 


21 


19 


20 


50 years and 


























over 


40 
100 


44 
100 


30 
100 


38 

100 


30 
100 


36 
100 


29 
100 


32 
100 


23 
100 


32 
100 


29 
100 


31 


Total 


100 


(Base) 


211 


167 


65 


127 


67 


45 


258 


109 


99 


103 


80 


955 



Note: Totals may not add to 100% due to rounding. 

The U.S. Mainland category is included so that comparisons can be made between 1 973 and 1974 data. 



73 



CANADIAN VACATION TRAVEL TO THE UNITED STATES IN 1974 
BY MARITAL STATUS 



II-L 



NEW ENGLAND REGION 



CANADA EUROPE 



CARIB- TOTAL 



BEAN 



U.S. 



Total Maine 



Massa- 
chu- 
setts 



All 
Other 



EASTERN GATEWAY GEORGE 
WASH- 

New New INGT0N 
T0tal York Jersey C0UNTRY 



27% 


27% 


64 


63 


10 


10 


00 


100 


36 


57 



Marital status : 

Single 28% 27% 21% 27% 25% 26% 36% 15% 25% 24% 

Married 59 55 61 59 63 63 50 76 63 62 

Wid./Div./Sep.. .. 13 18 16 14 12 11 14 10 12 15 

Total 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 ;no 

(Base) 2,274 209 78 1,027 173 76 51 73 151 123 

THE SOUTH FAR WEST 

GREAT FRON- 

All LAKES WEST TIER Cali " Wash " All 

Total Florida _ u COUNTRY WEST Total fnr inn 

Other Tor- mg- Other 

nia ton 
Maritial status: 

Single 26% 23% 36% 23% 20% 36% 29% 28% 30% 26% 

Married 60 63 53 63 74 43 55 49 64 59 

Wid./Div./Sep.... 14 14 12 15 6 22 16 23 6 15 

Total 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 

(Base) 211 167 65 127 67 45 258 109 99 103 

Note: Totals may not add to 100% due to rounding. 

The U.S. Mainland category is included so that comparisons can be made between 1973 and 1974 data 



U.S. 
ISLANDS 
REGION 



U.S. 
MAIN- 
LAND 



39% 


26% 


53 


60 


8 


14 


100 


100 


80 


955 



74 



CANADIAN VACATION TRAVEL TO THE UNITED STATES IN 1974 
BY EDUCATION 



II-M 



CANADA EUROPE 



CARIB- TOTAL 



BEAN 



U.S. 



NEW ENGLAND REGION 



Total 



Massa- 
chu- 
setts 



All 
Other 



EASTERN GATEWAY GEORGE 
WASH- 
INGTON 



Total 



New 



New 



York Jersey 



COUNTRY 



Education: 

Public/ 

Elementary .... 16% 11% 

(Some) (9) (4) 

(Graduated) . . (7) (7) 

Secondary /High 

School 48 42 

(Some) (26) (20) 

(Graduated) . . (22) (22) 

Tech ./Sr. College. 15 10 

(Some) (7) (2) 

(Graduated). . . (8) (8) 

University 20 37 

(Some) (8) (7) 

(Graduated) . . (12) (30) 

Refused 1 — 

Total 100 100 

(Base) 2,274 209 



(4) 

(4) 

40 
(16) 
(24) 

19 

(6) 
(13) 

33 
(12) 
(21) 



100 
78 



11% 

(4) 

(7) 



50 

(25) 

(25) 

14 

(5) 

(9) 

25 

(10) 

(15) 

100 
1,027 



13% 
(6) 

(7) 



50 

(28) 

(22) 

19 

(6) 

(13) 

18 

(4) 

(14) 

100 
173 



13% 

(8) 

(5) 

53 
(28) 
(25) 

15 

(8) 
(7) 
19 
(5) 
(14) 

100 

76 



10% 

(4) 

(6) 

44 
(28) 
(16) 
21 
(1) 
(20) 
25 
(3) 
(22) 

100 
51 



12% 
(4) 

(8) 

54 

(31) 

(23) 

16 

(5) 

(11) 

18 

(5) 

(13) 

100 
73 



11% 

(5) 

(6) 

47 

(23) 

(24) 

10 

(3) 

(7) 

32 

(15) 

(17) 

100 
151 



9% 
(4) 
(5) 

46 

(23) 

(23) 

8 

(2) 

(6) 

37 
(18) 
(19) 

100 
123 



14% 

(8) 

(6) 

45 
(23) 
(22) 

17 

(6) 
(11) 

24 
(11) 
(13) 

100 
36 



8% 
(4) 
(4) 

48 

(26) 

(22) 

9 

(3) 

(6) 

35 
(16) 
(19) 



100 
57 





THE SOUTH 




GREAT 




FRON- 




FAR WEST 




U.S. 




















U.S. 










LAKES 


OLD 


TIER 




Cali- 


Wash- 


All 
Other 


ISLANDS 


MAIN- 




Total 


Florida 


All 
Other 


COUNTRY 


WEST 


WEST 


Total 


for- 
nia 


ing- 
ton 


REGION 


LAND 


Education: 


























Public/ 


























Elementary .... 


12% 


12% 


14% 


11% 


9% 


23% 


9% 


9% 


6% 


12% 


8% 


11% 


(Some) 


(4) 


(4) 


(4) 


(4) 


(1) 


(1) 


(2) 


(2) 


(1) 


(3) 


(4) 


(4) 


(Graduated) . . 


(8) 


(8) 


(10) 


(7) 


(8) 


(22) 


(7) 


(7) 


(5) 


(9) 


(4) 


(7) 


Secondary/High 


























School 


53 


52 


52 


61 


46 


46 


48 


45 


50 


48 


48 


51 


(Some) 


(23) 


(24) 


(21) 


(35) 


(19) 


(16) 


(23) 


(20) 


(24) 


(23) 


(18) 


(26) 


(Graduated) . . 


(30) 


(28) 


(31) 


(26) 


(27) 


(30) 


(25) 


(25) 


(26) 


(25) 


(30) 


(25) 


Tech./Sr. College . 


15 


13 


21 


12 


11 


8 


10 


13 


13 


10 


14 


13 


(Some) 


(6) 


(5) 


(7) 


(7) 


(6) 


(3) 


(2) 


(2) 


(4) 


(3) 


(2) 


(5) 


(Graduated) . . 


(9) 


(8) 


(14) 


(5) 


(5) 


(5) 


(8) 


(11) 


(9) 


(7) 


(12) 


(8) 


University 


18 


21 


13 


15 


31 


23 


29 


32 


28 


26 


30 


24 


(Some) 


(5) 


(6) 


(5) 


(7) 


(13) 


(12) 


(15) 


(13) 


(17) 


(13) 


(12) 


(10) 


(Graduated) . . 


(13) 


(15) 


(8) 


(8) 


(18) 


(11) 


(14) 


(19) 


(11) 


(13) 


(18) 


(14) 


Refused 


2 


2 


- 


1 


3 


— 


4 


1 


3 


4 


— 


1 


Total 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


(Base) 


211 


167 


65 


127 


67 


45 


258 


109 


99 


103 


80 


955 



The U.S. Mainland category is included so that comparisons can be made between 1973 and 1974 data. 

75 



597-433 O - 75 - 6 



CANADIAN VACATION TRAVEL TO THE UNITED STATES IN 1974 
BY OCCUPATION OF HEAD OF HOUSE 



II-N 



CANADA EUROPE 



CARIB- TOTAL 



BEAN 



U.S. 



NEW ENGLAND REGION 



Total 



Massa- 
laine chu- 
setts 



All 
Other 



EASTERN GATEWAY 



Total 



New 
York 



GEORGE 
WASH- 

New INGT0N 
Jersey COUNTRY 



Occupation— Head of 
house : 

Professional/Sales/ 

White collar 42% 

Skilled labor 26 

Unskilled labor. . . 7 

Student 3 

Retired/ 

Pensioned 9 

Other 11 

Refused 2 

Total 100 

(Base) 2,274 



57% 


58% 


44% 


44% 


44% 


42% 


51% 


47% 


45% 


54% 


52% 


15 


25 


22 


28 


24 


35 


25 


22 


20 


32 


23 


9 


3 


6 


6 


4 


5 


8 


8 


10 


3 


9 


2 


- 


3 


1 


- 


1 


* 


4 


5 


- 


2 


6 


8 


11 


8 


13 


7 


4 


6 


6 


6 


8 


9 


4 


11 


12 


14 


7 


12 


9 


9 


5 


6 


2 


2 


3 


1 


1 


3 


- 


4 


5 


- 


* 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


209 


78 


1,027 


173 


76 


51 


73 


151 


123 


36 


57 







THE SOUTH 




GREAT 


OLD 
WEST 


FRON- 




FAR WEST 




U.S. 




















U.S. 








All 
Other 


LAKES 


TIER 




Cali- 


Wash- 


All 
Other 


ISLANDS 


MAIN- 




Total 


Florida 


COUNTRY 


WEST 


Total 


for- 
nia 


ing- 
ton 


REGION 


LAND 


Occupation— Head of 


























house: 


























Professional/Sales/ 


























White collar .... 


48% 


48% 


45% 


38% 


39% 


38% 


40% 


47% 


36% 


36% 


50% 


44% 


Skilled labor .... 


18 


17 


17 


22 


25 


8 


24 


17 


31 


18 


18 


23 


Unskilled labor . . 


5 


5 


5 


5 


11 


10 


5 


2 


5 


7 


2 


6 


Student 


4 


3 


8 


4 


4 


6 


5 


7 


7 


4 


2 


3 


Retired/ 


























Pensioned 


14 


16 


13 


13 


6 


8 


11 


7 


10 


18 


15 


10 


Other 


10 

1 


10 
1 


11 
1 


15 
3 


10 
5 


25 
5 


12 
3 


19 
1 


7 
4 


12 
5 


9 
4 


11 


Refused 


3 


Total 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


(Base) 


211 


167 


65 


127 


67 


45 


258 


109 


99 


103 


80 


955 



* Less than 1/2 of 1%. 
The U.S. Mainland category is included so that comparisons can be made between 1973 and 1974 data. 



76 



II-O 



CANADIAN VACATION TRAVEL TO THE UNITED STATES IN 1974 
BY FAMILY INCOME 



NEWENG LAND REGION 



EASTERN GATEWAY 



GEORGE 



-,„,„. rimnPF CARIB TOTAL 

CANADA EUROPE bean ^ Massa- A|| 

Total Maine chu- ^ Total York C „ UNTRY 

setts 



WASH- 
New New INGTON 



Family income : 

Under $5,000 

$5,000 to 
$7.499 



$7,500 to 
$9,999 . 



$10,000 to 
$14,999 



$15,000 to 
$16,999 . 



$17,000 to 
$19,999 . 



$20,000 and 
over 

Refused . . . 



11% 
10 
14 
25 



20 
3 



6% 1% 10% 6% 5% 9% 4% 11% 13% 11% 



20 

10 
10 

34 

3 



6 

22 

12 

10 

39 
7 



12 



2? 



10 



24 
6 



11 



12 



23 



26 
4 



15 


2 


13 


12 


10 


13 


24 


22 


29 



22 
4 



13 

33 

4 



24 
3 



26 



14 



21 

5 



26 



15 



21 

5 



3 
14 
27 

15 



20 
2 



10% 

7 

8 
21 

15 

11 

25 
4 



Total 



100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 



(Base) 2,274 209 78 1,02/ 173 



76 



51 



73 151 



123 



36 



$15,000 to 
$16,999 . . 



$17,000 to 
$19,999 . . . 

$20,000 and 
over 

Refused . . . 



Total 
(Base) 



100 
57 





THE SOUTH 




GREAT 


OLD 
WEST 


FRON- 




FAR WEST 




U.S. 




















U.S. 








All 
Other 


LAKES 


TIER 




Cali- 


Wash- 


All 
Other 


ISLANDS 


MAIN- 




Total 


Florida 


COUNTRY 


WEST 


Total 


for- 
nia 


ing- 
ton 


REGION 


LAND 


Family income. 


























Under $5,000 


11% 


9% 


16% 


9% 


6% 


21% 


12% 


13% 


11% 


14% 


12% 


10% 


55,000 to 


























$7,499 


10 


9 


16 


8 


3 


10 


10 


14 


7 


8 


4 


9 


57,500 to 


























$9,999 


10 


12 


6 


16 


15 


6 


12 


8 


12 


17 


5 


12 


$10,000 to 


























$14,999 


19 


19 


19 


23 


22 


14 


24 


19 


25 


28 


21 


22 



29 

6 



29 
6 



23 
6 



10 



17 
6 



100 100 

211 1 67 



100 100 

65 127 



11 

20 
5 

100 

67 



20 
18 



22 
5 



100 100 

45 258 



1b 



23 

4 

100 
109 



11 



24 


21 


31 


24 


6 


6 


9 


6 


100 


100 


100 


100 


99 


103 


80 


955 



10 



Note: Totals may not add to 100% due to rounding. 

The U.S. Mainland category is included so that comparisons ca be made between 1973 and 1974 data. 



77 



CANADIAN VACATION TRAVEL TO THE UNITED STATES IN 1974 
BY SOCIO-ECONOMIC LEVEL 



IIP 



CANADA EUROPE 



CARIB- TOTAL 



BEAN 



U.S. 



NEW ENGLAND REGION 



Total 



Massa- 
chu- 
setts 



All 
Other 



EASTERN GATEWAY 



Total 



New New 
York Jersey 



GEORGE 
WASH- 
INGTON 
COUNTRY 



Socio-economic Level : 

Upper 23% 41% 35% 29% 32% 29% 41% 31% 15% 15% 14% 32% 

Upper-middle ... 23 23 26 21 20 19 15 25 19 20 19 22 

Middle 20 13 17 19 19 17 18 21 27 26 24 20 

Lower-middle... 19 15 17 17 14 13 15 15 26 28 29 22 

Lower 15 8 5 15 14 21 12 8 13 11 14 5 

Total 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 

(Base) 2,274 209 77 702 118 52 34 48 94 80 21 41 





THE SOUTH 




GREAT 


OLD 
WEST 


FRON- 




FAR WEST 




U.S. 




















U.S. 




Total 


Florida 


All 
Other 


LAKES 
COUNTRY 


TIER 
WEST 


Total 


Cali- 
for- 
nia 


Wash- 
ing- 
ton 


All 
Other 


ISLANDS 
REGION 


MAIN- 
LAND 


Socio-economic Level: 


32% 


37% 


17% 


24% 


31% 


31% 


28% 


32% 


31% 


25% 


35% 




Upper 


28% 


Upper-middle . . . 


18 


20 


23 


20 


31 


22 


19 


20 


19 


24 


27 


20 


Middle 


17 


15 


21 


24 


20 


3 


18 


15 


23 


14 


12 


20 


Lower-middle . . . 


15 


12 


21 


14 


8 


22 


17 


11 


15 


25 


18 


16 


Lower 


17 


16 


19 


19 


10 


22 


17 


23 


12 


11 


8 


15 


Total 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


(Base) 


142 


109 


48 


88 


49 


32 


186 


81 


73 


71 


51 


657 



Note: Totals may not add to 100% due to rounding. 

The U.S. Mainland category is included so that comparisons can be made between 1 973 and 1974 data. 



78 



II-Q 



CANADIAN VACATION TRAVEL TO THE UNITED STATES IN 1974 
BY FAMILY COMPOSITION 



CANADA EUROPE 



CARIB- TOTAL 
BEAN U.S. 



NEW ENGLAND REGION EASTERN GATEWAY GEORGE 

WASH- 

Massa- .„ K1 K , INGTON 

Total Maine chu- *" Total "™ ^ COUNTRY 

Other York Jersey 

setts 



Family composition: 

Adults only .... 

Adults with 
children 

With children 
15-17 

With children 
5-14 

With children 
under 5 . . . . 

Total .... 
(Base). . . . 



54% 64% 53% 62% 55% 48% 60% 59% 62% 62% 62% 62% 



46 



36 



47 



38 



45 



52 



40 



41 



38 



38 



38 



(18) (13) (15) (14) (18) (22) (20) (16) (10) (9) (16) 



(31) (27) (30) (26) (34) (39) (30) (32) (22) (23) (17) 



38 



[15) 



(28) 



(16) (10) (21) (13) (15) (M 



UK (15) (15) (15) (14) (14) 



100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 

2,274 209 78 1,027 173 76 51 73 151 123 36 57 





THE SOUTH 




GREAT 


OLD 
WEST 


FRON- 




FAR WEST 




U.S. 




















U.S. 








All 
Other 


LAKES 


TIER 




Cali- 


Wash- 


All 
Other 


ISLANDS 


MAIN- 




Total 


Florida 


COUNTRY 


WEST 


Total 


for- 
nia 


ing- 
ton 


REGION 


LAND 


Family composition: 


























Adults only 


64% 


65% 


62% 


63% 


53% 


84% 


65% 


71% 


51% 


71% 


71% 


62% 


Adults with 


























children 


36 


35 


38 


37 


47 


16 


35 


29 


49 


29 


29 


38 


With children 


























15-17 


(16) 


(17) 


(17) 


(17) 


(15) 


(7) 


(13) 


(9) 


(21) 


(11) 


(15) 


(14) 


With children 


























5-14 


(26) 


(27) 


(24) 


(22) 


(33) 


(7) 


(26) 


(21) 


(37) 


(24) 


(18) 


(27) 


With children 


























under 5 


(10) 


(7) 


(16) 


(12) 


(25) 


(9) 


(12) 


(8) 


(17) 


(9) 


(3) 


(13) 


Total 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


(Base) 


211 


167 


65 


127 


67 


45 


258 


109 


99 


103 


80 


955 



79 



II-R 



CANADIAN VACATION TRAVEL TO THE UNITED STATES IN 1974 
BY NUMBER OF ADULTS FROM OWN HOUSEHOLD 



NEW ENGLAND REGION 



EASTERN GATEWAY 



CANADA EUROPE 



CARIB- 
BEAN 



TOTAL 
U.S. 



Total 



Massa- 
chu- 
setts 



All 
Other 



Total 



New 
York 



New 
Jersey 



GEORGE 
WASH- 
INGTON 
COUNTRY 



Number adults from 
own household : 

One 50% 

Two 47 

Three 3 

Four 1 

Five or more 

Total 100 

(Base) 2,274 

Mean 1.55 



62% 


54% 


46% 


42% 


36% 


52% 


32% 


40% 


41% 


36 


46 


51 


54 


59 


46 


63 


57 


56 


2 


1 


2 


2 


4 


2 


2 


2 


2 



100 
209 
1.50 



100 

78 

1.47 



100 

1,027 

1.59 



100 
173 
1.65 



1 

100 

76 

1.71 



100 

51 
1.51 



100 

73 

1.75 



100 
151 
1.66 



100 
123 
1.64 



36% 44% 

60 52 

3 2 

1 2 

1 

100 100 

36 57 

1.71 1.63 





THE SOUTH 




GREAT 

LAKES 

COUNTRY 


OLD 
WEST 


FRON- 
TIER 
WEST 




FAR WEST 




U.S. 
ISLANDS 
REGION 






Total 


Florida 


All 
Other 


Total 


Cali- 
for- 
nia 


Wash- 
ing- 
ton 


All 
Other 


U.S. 

MAIN- 
LAND 


Number adults from 


























own household: 


























One 


46% 
50 


43% 
53 


54% 
44 


40% 
56 


28% 
70 


56% 
40 


51% 
47 


58% 
39 


34% 
61 


51% 
46 


51% 
48 


46% 


Two 


50 


Three 


3 

1 


3 
1 

* 


1 

1 


4 
1 

* 


2 
1 


1 
3 


2 

* 


3 


4 
1 


2 


1 


2 


Four 


1 


Five or more .... 


* 


Total 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


(Base) 


211 


167 


65 


127 


67 


45 


258 


109 


99 


103 


80 


955 


Mean 


160 


1.63 


1.50 


1.67 


1.78 


1.51 


1.52 


1.47 


1.71 


1.52 


1.51 


1.60 



'Less than 1/2 of 1%. 
Note: Totals may not add to 100% due to rounding. 

The U.S. Mainland category is included so that comparisons can be made between 1973 and 1 974 data. 



80 



SECTION 



TRIP CHARACTERISTICS 



81 



III-A 



CANADIAN VACATION TRIPS TO THE UNITED STATES IN 1974 
BY PURPOSE OF TRIP 

NEW ENGLAND REGION EASTERN GATEWAY 

CANADA EUROPE ™* ™™. Mass , 

BEAN U.S. T ,, All _ New New 

Total Maine chu- _ , Total 

Other York Jersey 

setts 

Purpose of trip: 

To visit friends or 
relatives 52% 57% 19% 33% 38% 30% 49% 38% 38% 43% 15% 

To stay at a sum- 
mer place I own. . 4 12 2 12 12 2 2 

To spend some 
time at a vaca- 
tion spot 19 17 70 37 36 44 32 33 39 31 73 

Camping/Tenting. 13 1 1 8 15 20 12 17 14 13 14 

Fishing/Boating/ 
or other out- 
door activities ..15 2 4 6 6 8 3 7 4 4 1 

Sightseeing away 
from the cities 
and towns 13 17 16 16 15 15 16 21 14 17 6 

Sightseeing and 
doing things in 
cities and 
towns 11 25 14 20 10 9 11 14 14 17 4 

To visit "Man 
and His World" 
in Montreal 1 1 

Shopping 45176497564 

To attend sports/ 

festivals/or 

other special 

events 5578331579 

Combined busi- 
ness and plea- 
sure 8 17 13 8 4 4 4 5 7 8 2 

Other 5 11 6 7 5 2 5 7 4 3 11 

Total 150 158 153 153 139 141 142 155 148 153 132 

(Base) 2,274 209 78 1,027 173 76 51 73 151 123 36 

Note: Includes mulitple answers. 

The U.S. Mainland category is included so that comparisons can be made between 1973 and 1974 data. 
—Data not available. 
* Less than 1/2 of 1%. 



GEORGE 
WASH- 
INGTON 
COUNTRY 



23% 



36 

14 

1 I 
28 

24 



15 

7 

162 

57 



83 



III-A-Con. 



CANADIAN VACATION TRIPS TO THE UNITED STATES IN 1974-Con. 
BY PURPOSE OF TRIP 





THE SOUTH 




GREAT 


OLD 
WEST 


FRON- 




FAR WEST 




U.S. 




















U.S. 








All 


LAKES 


TIER 




Cali- 


Wash- 


All 
Other 


ISLANDS 


MAIN- 




Total 


Florida 


Other 


COUNTRY 


WEST 


Total 


for- 
nia 


ing- 
ton 


REGION 


LAND 


Purpose of trip: 


























To visit friends or 


























relatives 


20% 


21% 


19% 


51% 


41% 


33% 


38% 


45% 


42% 


25% 


9% 


36% 


To stay at a sum- 


























mer place 1 own. . 


4 


5 


1 


- 


- 


- 


* 


- 


1 


- 


* 


2 


To spend some 


























time at a vaca- 


























tion spot 


55 


59 


50 


20 


38 


28 


24 


21 


20 


34 


65 


35 


Camping/Tenting. 


5 


1 


14 


5 


12 


2 


10 


5 


18 


16 


2 


9 


Fishing/Boating/ 


























or other out- 


























door activities. . . 


8 


7 


13 


5 


8 


5 


6 


3 


14 


6 


8 


6 


Sightseeing away 


























from the cities 


























and towns 


14 


10 


32 


17 


31 


25 


23 


18 


34 


26 


23 


16 


Sightseeing and 


























doing things in 


























cities and 


























towns 


17 


15 


28 


21 


38 


19 


33 


30 


36 


41 


27 


19 


To visit "Man 


























and His World" 


























in Montreal .... 


1 


1 


- 


2 


2 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 


Shopping 


8 


6 


10 


7 


15 


5 


9 


8 


12 


11 


10 


7 


To attend sports/ 


























festivals/or 














- 












other special 


























events 


5 


2 


12 


12 


16 


9 


13 


7 


23 


15 


7 


8 


Combined busi- 


























ness and plea- 


























sure 


8 
9 

154 


6 
10 

143 


15 
8 

202 


5 
7 

152 


9 
3 

213 


18 
7 

151 


9 
9 

175 


10 
10 

157 


7 
9 

217 


11 
9 

194 


10 
6 

167 


8 


Other 


7 


Total 


154 


(Base) 


211 


167 


65 


127 


67 


45 


258 


109 


99 


103 


80 


955 



Note: Includes multiple answers. 

The U.S. Mainland category is included so that comparisons can be made between 1973 and 1974 data. 
—Data not available. 
* Less than 1/2 of 1%. 



84 



III-B 



TOTAL CANADIAN VACATION TRAVEL, BY MAIN PURPOSE OF TRIP, 1967-74 

Percent of total trips 



1967 1972 1973 1974 

% % % % 



lain purpose of trip: 

To visit friends or relatives 

To spend some time at a vacation spot 

■ Sightseeing and doing things in cities and towns 

Sightseeing and doing things away from cities and towns 

Fishing, boating, other outdoor activities 

Camping and tenting 

Shopping 

To stay at a summer place I own 

To visit "Man and His World'VExpo 

To attend sports, festivals, and special events 

Combined business and pleasure 

Other 



45 


47 


44 


^ 


19 


25 


23 


24 


11 


11 


13 


13 


9 


13 


14 


13 


12 


10 


10 


11 


8 


10 


12 


10 


5 


6 


4 


5 


4 


5 


3 


3 


20 


1 


1 


1 


3 


5 


5 


5 


5 


10 


9 


8 


5 


4 


4 


6 



85 



CANADIAN VACATION TRAVEL TO THE UNITED STATES IN 1974 
BY PURPOSE OF TRIP, NIGHTS SPENT IN THE U.S. AND MONTH TRIP STARTED** 



III-C 



Purpose of trip 



Total 

U.S. 

trips 



Nights in United States 



1-5 



6-11 





18 


and 


17 


over 


26 




30 


3 




2 


50 




44 


9 




6 


5 




5 


14 




11 


20 




18 


1 




- 


6 




7 


5 




2 


5 




7 


4 




9 


148 




141 


217 




153 



Visit friends or relatives 

To stay at a summer place I own 

To spend some time at a vacation spot 

Camping/tenting 

Fishing/boating/or other outdoor activities 
Sightseeing away from the cities and towns .... 
Sightseeing and doing things in cities and towns 

To visit "Man and His World" in Montreal 

Shopping 

To attend sports/festivals/or other special events 

Combined business and pleasure 

Other 

Total 

(Base) 

*Less than % of 1%. 
**lncludes multiple answers. 
-Data not available. 



33 
2 

37 
8 
6 

16 

20 
1 
7 
8 
8 
7 

153 
1,027 



45 

* 

22 
7 
7 

20 

22 
1 
8 

12 
9 
6 

159 
308 



28 
1 

41 

10 
6 

17 

17 

* 

7 
8 
8 

7 

150 
334 



86 



III-D 



CANADIAN VACATION TRAVEL TO THE UNITED STATES IN 1974, 
BY PURPOSE OF TRIP, NIGHTS SPENT IN THE UNITED STATES, 
AND MONTH TRIP STARTED 



Purpose of trip 



U.S. 


December 


April 


June 


October 


trips 


to 


to 


to 


to 






March 


May 


September 


Novem 


ber 


33 


25 


35 


36 




39 


2 


2 


1 


2 




2 


37 


48 


32 


36 




25 


8 


2 


5 


14 




2 


6 


6 


2 


6 




8 


16 


10 


19 


19 




15 


20 


17 


22 


20 




22 


1 


1 


- 


1 




1 


7 


5 


10 


8 




7 


8 


6 


6 


9 




8 


8 


8 


10 


8 




6 


7 


8 


11 


4 




11 


153 


138 


153 


163 




146 


1,027 


262 


104 


524 




137 



Visit friends or relatives 

To stay at a summer place I own 

To spend some time at a vacation spot 

Camping/tenting 

Fishing/boating/or other outdoor activities . . . . 
Sightseeing away from the cities and towns 
Sightseeing and doing things in cities and towns. 

To visit "Man and His World" in Montreal 

Shopping 

To attend sports/festivals/or other special events 

Combined business and pleasure 

Other 

Total 

(Base) 

Note: Includes multiple answers. 
— Data not available. 



87 



III-E 



CANADIAN VACATION TRAVEL TO THE UNITED STATES IN 1974 
BY TOTAL ADULTS IN PARTY 



CANADA EUROPE 



CARIB- TOTAL 



BEAN 



U.S. 



NEW ENGLAND REGION 



Total 



Massa- 
chu- 
setts 



All 
Other 



EASTERN GATEWAY GEORGE 
WASH- 
INGTON 



Total 



New 
York 



New 
Jersey 



COUNTRY 



Total adults in party: 

1 Person 26% 

2 People 49 

3 People 10 

4 People 9 

5 or more 

people 6 

Total 100 

(Base) 2,274 

Mean 2.29 



42% 


22% 


22% 


15% 


4% 


26% 


14% 


18% 


21% 


12% 


18% 


42 


49 


53 


57 


61 


59 


57 


55 


57 


46 


56 


6 


5 


7 


7 


7 


3 


8 


7 


7 


7 


2 


3 


10 


13 


13 


18 


7 


9 


17 


13 


29 


18 


6 


14 


6 


9 


11 


5 


12 


3 


2 


7 


7 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


209 


78 


1,027 


173 


76 


51 


73 


151 


123 


36 


57 


2.13 


2.90 


2.36 


2.53 


2.73 


2.26 


2.71 


2.38 


2.24 


2.75 


2.55 





THE SOUTH 




GREAT 


OLD 
WEST 


FRON- 




FAR WEST 




U.S. 




















U.S. 








All 
Other 


LAKES 


TIER 




Cali- 


Wash- 


All 
Other 


ISLANDS 


MAIN- 




Total 


Florida 


COUNTRY 


WEST 


Total 


for- 
nia 


ing- 
ton 


REGION 


LAND 


Total adults in party: 


























1 Person 


24% 


26% 


20% 


21% 


9% 


41% 


25% 


35% 


13% 


22% 


21% 


22% 


2 People 


48 


52 


40 


54 


72 


39 


57 


49 


65 


60 


55 


53 


3 People 


7 


7 


6 


9 


8 


1 


8 


7 


10 


9 


7 


2 


4 People 


12 


11 


13 


11 


10 


13 


8 


7 


9 


9 


16 


12 


5 or more 


























people 


8 


4 


20 


4 


1 


7 


3 


3 


3 


1 


6 


6 


Total 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


(Base) 


211 


167 


65 


127 


67 


45 


258 


109 


99 


103 


80 


955 


Mean 


2.48 


2.21 


3.08 


2.31 


2.26 


2.18 


2.11 


1.95 


2.25 


2.12 


2.36 


2.36 



Note: Totals may not add to 100% due to rounding. 

The U.S. Mainland category is included so that comparisons can be made between 1 973 and 1 974 data. 



TOTAL CANADIAN VACATION TRAVEL 
BY MAIN MODE OF TRANSPORT 
1966-1974 



Main Mode of Transport 



III-F 



Other 
Bus 

Train 
Plane 



2%- 



Car 



7% 



I 



4% 



6% 



5% 





1966 



1972 



1973 



1974 



' In 1973 and 1974, "motorcamper" was included as a separate answer category. In this chart, it is added to "car" for greater comparability. 



89 



CANADIAN VACATION TRIPS TO THE UNITED STATES IN 1974 
BY MAIN MODE OF TRANSPORT 



III-G 



CANADA EUROPE 



CARIB- TOTAL 



BEAN 



U.S. 



NEW ENGLAND REGION 



Total 



Massa- 
Maine chu- 
setts 



All 
Other 



EASTERN GATEWAY GEORGE 
WASH- 

m m INGTON 

,. New New 

Total COUNTRY 

York Jersey 



Main mode of 
transportation: 

Air 20% 95% 

Auto 65 4 

Bus 6 2 

Train 5 4 

Ship 1 

Motor camper ... 3 

Other 3 1 

Total 103 106 

(Base) 2,274 209 



99% 


39% 


18% 


1% 


36% 


16% 


20% 


23% 


6% 


23' 


1 


48 


74 


90 


57 


77 


67 


63 


79 


59 


* 


9 


6 


5 


4 


7 


11 


13 


12 


14 


* 


1 


* 


* 


1 


* 


2 


2 


* 


3 


1 


1 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


2 


2 


3 


2 


1 


* 


* 


* 


2 


* 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


3 


* 


100 


102 


100 


100 


100 


102 


100 


103 


100 


100 


78 


1,027 


173 


76 


51 


73 


151 


123 


36 


57 





THE SOUTH 




GREAT 


OLD 
WEST 


FRON- 




FAR WEST 




U.S. 




















U.S. 








All 
Other 


LAKES 


TIER 




Cali- 


Wash- 


All 
Other 


ISLANDS 


MAIN- 




Total 


Florida 


COUNTRY 


WEST 


Total 


for- 
nia 


ing- 
ton 


REGION 


LAND 


Main mode of 


























transportation: 


























Air 


53% 

30 

12 

* 

2 


62% 
29 
9 

* 

1 


15% 

46 

20 

5 


13% 
70 
10 
4 


9% 
80 
4 
1 

* 


53% 

26 

19 

1 


40% 

39 

14 

* 

3 


67% 
27 
8 

* 

2 


12% 
65 
9 

* 

1 


27% 

38 

27 

1 

4 


96% 
8 
1 

* 

1 


34% 


Auto 


52 


Bus 


10 


Train 


1 


Ship 


1 


Motor camper . . 


3 


1 


9 


3 


6 


5 


4 


* 


10 


5 


1 


2 


Other 


3 


1 


9 


4 


2 


3 


2 


2 


5 


2 


* 


2 


Total** .... 


103 


103 


104 


104 


102 


107 


102 


106 


102 


104 


106 


102 


(Base) 


211 


167 


65 


127 


67 


45 


258 


109 


99 


103 


80 


955 



'Less than 1/2 of 1%. 
Note: Includes multiple answers. 

The U.S. Mainland category is included so that comparisons can be made between 1973 and 1974 data. 



90 



III-H 



CHARACTERISTICS OF CANADIAN VACATION AIR TRAVELERS 



Percent of trips taken by air 

Change 1973 
1973 1974 to 1974 



/o 



0/ 

/o 



0/ 

/o 



Total 

Place of residence: 

Atlantic Provinces 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Prairie Provinces 

British Columbia 

Areas visited: 

Canada 

Atlantic Provinces 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Prairie Provinces 

British Columbia 

U.S. (Mainland) 

Total U.S 

All Other Countries 

Marital status: 

Married 

Single 

Separated/widowed/divorced 

Type of dwelling: 

Detached/Semi-detached 

Townhouse 

Apartment 

Education (attended or completed) 

University 

Technical/Preparatory 

High School 

Public School 

91 



24 



32 



i8 



24 


(39j 


l +15 


20 


v 

25 


+5 


27 


34 


+7 


20 


31 


(+11 


28 


32 


+4 



14 


20 


+6 


18 


25 


(« 


8 


11 


> — ■ 

+3 


13 


16 


+3 


18 


21 


+3 


21 


26 
s — x 


+5 


22 


(33) 


(+11 


n.a. 


39 


- 


85 


90 


+5 



21 


27 


+6 


28 


36 


+8 


28 


41 


+13 



22 


29 


+7 


19 


27 


+8 


33 


(41 ) 


+8 



39 


I 44 J 


+5 


32 


(41J 


+9 


23 


34 


+ 11 


13 


21 


+8 



597-433 O - 75 - 7 



III-H-Con. 



CHARACTERISTICS OF CANADIAN VACATION AIR TRAVELERS-Continued 



Percent of trips taken by air 



1973 

% 



Change 1973 
1974 to 1974 



0/ 

/o 



0/ 

/o 



Socio-economic level: 

Upper 

Upper middle 

Middle 

Lower middle 

Lower 

Language: 

French Quebec 

All other 

Family composition: 

Adults only 

Have children under 18 years 



31 


(S) 


+12 


24 


32 


+8 


23 


25 


+ 12 


23 


29 


+6 


15 


23 


+8 



15 
26 

29 
18 



18 
34 

36 
26 



+3 
+8 

+7 
+8 



92 



II II 



CANADIAN VACATION TRIPS TO THE UNITED STATES IN 1974, 
BY MAIN MODE OF TRANSPORT AND MONTH TRIP STARTED 





Total 


December 


April 


June October 


Main mode of transport 


U.S. 


to 


to 


to to 




trips 


March 


May 


September November 



Air 39 

Auto 48 

Bus 9 

Train 1 

Ship 1 

Motor camper 2 

Other 2 

Total 102 

(Base) 1,027 



66 


44 


23 


42 


26 


36 


64 


42 


9 


14 


8 


13 


1 


4 


1 


* 


1 


1 


2 


* 


1 


1 


3 


4 


1 


2 


2 


1 


05 


102 


103 


102 


62 


104 


524 


134 



h Less than 1/2 of 1%. 
Note: Includes multiple answers. 



III-J 



CANADIAN VACATION TRIPS TO THE UNITED STATES IN 1974, BY MAIN MODE 
OF TRANSPORT, NIGHTS SPENT IN THE UNITED STATES, AND MONTH TRIP STARTED 



Main mode of transport 



Total 
U.S. 
trips 



Nights in United States 



1-5 



6- 11 



12-17 18 & over 



Air 39 

Auto 48 

Bus 9 

Train 1 

Ship 1 

Motor camper 2 

Other 2 

Total 102 

(Base) 1,027 

* Less than 1/2 of 1%. 
Includes multiple answers. 
Note: Includes multiple answers. 



27 

61 
7 
1 

1 
4 
2 

103 

308 



34 


52 


49 


39 


13 


8 


2 


1 


2 


1 


2 


1 


1 


2 


103 


104 


334 


217 



54 

33 

9 

1 
* 

3 
2 

102 

153 



93 



III-K 



TOTAL CANADIAN VACATION TRAVEL, BY MONTH TRIP STARTED, 1966-74 

Percent of trips 



1966 1969 1973 1974 

% % % % 



Month trip started: 

January 3 2 3 3 

February 3 4 4 4 

March 5 4 5 6 

April 5 4 4 4 

May 4 6 6 6 

June 8 10 8 9 

July 30) 28) 25) 25) 

> 44 



)) 28) 25) 

> 52 > 49 > 45 

!) 2lJ 20) 



August 22) 21) 20) 19! 

September 7 8 9 9 

October 5 7 8 9 

November 3 2 3 3 

December , 5 4 5 4 



94 



III-L 



CANADIAN VACATION TRIPS TO THE UNITED STATES IN 1974 
BY SEASONALITY OF TRIP (QUARTERLY) 



CANADA EUROPE 



CARIB- TOTAL 



BEAN 



U.S. 



NEW ENGLAND REGION 



Total 



Massa- 
chu- 
setts 



All 
Other 



EASTERN GATEWAY 



Total 



New 



New 



York Jersey 



GEORGE 
WASH- 
INGTON 
COUNTRY 



Time trip started: 

1st quarter 8% 16% 46% 20% 3% 1% 5% 5% 5% 6% 0% 15% 

2nd quarter 18 24 23 18 16 19 17 14 18 21 5 19 

(1st half) (26) (40) (69) (38) (19) (20) (22) (19) (23) (27) (5) (34) 

3rd quarter 59 43 17 43 64 75 59 55 60 53 87 56 

4th quarter 15 17 14 19 17 5 19 26 17 20 8 10 

(2nd half) ... . (74) (60) (31) (62) (81) (80) (78) (81) (77) (73) (95) (66) 

Total 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 

(Base) 2,274 209 78 1,027 173 76 51 73 151 123 36 57 





THE SOUTH 




GREAT 


OLD 
WEST 


FRON- 




FAR WEST 




U.S. 




















U.S. 








All 
Other 


LAKES 


TIER 




Cali- 


Wash- 


All 
Other 


ISLANDS 


MAIN- 




Total 


Florida 


COUNTRY 


WEST 


Total 


for- 
nia 


ing- 
ton 


REGION 


LAND 


Time trip started: 


























1st quarter .... 


43% 


50% 


21% 


13% 


9% 


26% 


18% 


23% 


7% 


18% 


50% 


18% 


2nd quarter .... 


14 


14 


19 


24 


17 


30 


20 


19 


25 


22 


18 


18 


(1st half) 


. (57) 


(64) 


(40) 


(37) 


(26) 


(56) 


(38) 


(42) 


(32) 


(40) 


(68) 


(36) 


3rd quarter .... 


19 


10 


37 


42 


58 


10 


43 


35 


56 


37 


18 


45 


4th quarter .... 


24 


26 


23 


21 


16 


34 


19 


23 


12 


23 


14 


19 


(2nd half). . . 


(43) 


(36) 


(60) 


(63) 


(74) 


(44) 


(62) 


(58) 


(68) 


(60) 


(32) 


(64) 


Total .... 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


(Base) 


211 


167 


65 


127 


67 


45 


258 


109 


99 


103 


80 


955 



95 



III-M 



CANADIAN VACATION TRIPS TO THE UNITED STATES IN 1974 
BY SEASONALITY OF TRIP (QUARTERLY) 



NEW ENGLAND REGION 



CANADA 



CARIB- 


TOTAL 






Massa- 




BEAN 


U.S. 








All 






Total 


Maine 


chu- 
setts 


Other 



EASTERN GATEWAY GEORGE 
WASH- 
INGTON 



Total 



New 



New 



York Jersey 



COUNTRY 



Month trip started: 

December to March 13% 26% 7% 1% 10% 12% 9% 11% 3% 

April to May 6 10 5 1 8 5 7 9 

June to September 74 51 75 93 69 63 70 65 92 

October to November ... . 7 13 13 4 14 19 13 15 5 

Total 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 

(Base) 188 1,027 173 76 51 73 151 123 36 

h trip s1 

jcember 
arch. . 

)ril to IV 

ne to 
jptembf 

;tober V 
ovembe 

Total 
(Base) 

Note: The U.S. Mainland category is included so that comparisons can be made between 1973 and 1974 data. 



16% 
14 
60 
10 

100 

57 





THE SOUTH 




GREAT 


OLD 
WEST 


FRON- 




FAR WEST 




U.S. 




















U.S. 




Total 


Florida 


All 
Other 


LAKES 
COUNTRY 


TIER 
WEST 


Total 


Cali- 
for- 
nia 


Wash- 
ing- 
ton 


All 
Other 


ISLANDS 
REGION 


MAIN- 
LAND 


Month trip started: 


























December to 


























March 


53% 


62% 


25% 


18% 


13% 


44% 


21% 


29% 


10% 


20% 


59% 


23% 


April to May 


10 


8 


15 


13 


9 


16 


12 


15 


12 


15 


16 


10 


June to 


























September 


23 


16 


42 


53 


66 


24 


51 


39 


69 


45 


20 


53 


October to 


























November 


15 


14 


18 


16 


12 


16 


15 


17 


9 


20 


4 


14 


Total 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


(Base) 


211 


167 


65 


128 


67 


45 


259 


109 


99 


103 


79 


956 



96 



CANADIAN VACATION TRIPS TO THE UNITED STATES IN 1974 
BY SEASONALITY OF TRIP (MONTHLY) 



III-N 



CANADA EUROPE 



Carib- 
bean 



Total 
U.S. 



NEW ENGLAND REGION 



Total 



iviassa- 
laine chu- 
setts 



All 
Other 



EASTERN GATEWAY GEORGE 
WASH- 
INGTON 



Total 



New 



New 



York Jersey 



COUNTRY 



lonth trip started: 

January 2% 

February 2 

March 3 

April 3 

May 5 

June 9 

July 29 

August 22 

September 9 

October 9 

November 2 

December 4 

Total 100 

(Base) 2,274 



4% 


7% 


4% 


* 


* 


1% 


* 


1% 


1% 


* 


3% 


5 


20 


6 


* 


* 


* 


1 


1 


1 


* 


3 


8 


20 


9 


3 


1 


5 


4 


3 


4 


* 


8 


5 


9 


5 


3 


1 


5 


2 


1 


1 


* 


9 


8 


4 


5 


2 


1 


2 


3 


6 


8 


1 


6 


11 


10 


8 


11 


18 


9 


8 


11 


12 


4 


4 


13 


3 


19 


27 


47 


35 


25 


26 


20 


44 


22 


15 


9 


16 


18 


19 


16 


21 


21 


21 


33 


28 


15 


5 


7 


8 


8 


9 


10 


12 


12 


11 


5 


8 


6 


9 


11 


4 


14 


15 


7 


9 


* 


6 


4 


1 


4 


2 


* 


1 


4 


6 


6 


5 


4 


5 


7 


6 


4 


1 


5 


6 


4 


5 


3 


1 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


209 


78 


1,027 


173 


76 


51 


73 


151 


123 


36 


57 





THE SOUTH 




GREAT 


OLD 

WEST 


FRON- 




FAR WEST 




U.S. 




















U.S. 








All 
Other 


LAKES 


TIER 




Calif- 


Wash- 


All 
Other 


ISLANDS 


MAIN- 




Total 


Florida 


COUNTRY 


WEST 


Total 


or- 
nia 


ing- 
ton 


REGION 


LAND 


Month trip started: 


7% 


8% 


3% 


1% 


3% 


9% 


5% 


7% 


3% 


5% 


18% 




January 


4% 


February 


12 


14 


5 


1 


3 


3 


8 


11 


3 


5 


19 


5 


March 


25 


28 


13 


11 


4 


13 


6 


5 


2 


8 


14 


9 


April 


5 
5 


5 
4 


6 
9 


5 
8 


5 
5 


9 
7 


6 
6 


11 
4 


3 
9 


6 

9 


11 
5 


5 


May 


5 


June 


4 
8 


5 
5 


4 
16 


12 

14 


8 
32 


14 
4 


8 

18 


4 
12 


13 
26 


8 
18 


2 

7 


9 


July 


20 


August 


7 


4 


14 


20 


21 


4 


17 


17 


22 


8 


7 


17 


September 


4 


2 


7 


7 


5 


3 


9 


7 


8 


11 


4 


8 


October 


10 


9 


14 


15 


9 


7 


10 


8 


7 


16 


4 


10 


November 


5 


6 


5 


2 


3 


9 


5 


9 


2 


5 


* 


4 


December 


10 


12 


4 


5 


3 


18 


3 


6 


3 


2 


10 


5 


Total 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


(Base) 


211 


167 


65 


127 


67 


45 


258 


109 


99 


103 


80 


955 



* Less than 1/2 of 1%. 
Note: Totals may not add to 100% due to rounding. 

The U.S. Mainland category is included so that comparisons can be made between 1973 and 1974 data. 



97 



III-O 



CANADIAN VACATION TRIPS, BY LENGTH OF STAY AND AREAS VISITED 

Average number of nights 
away on trips 



1966 



1972 



1973 



1974 



Areas visited: 

Canada — 

Atlantic Provinces 15.1 

Quebec 11.1 

Ontario 13.5 

Prairie Provinces 1 5.3 

British Columbia 14.7 

U.S.A. (Mainland) 15.7 

All other countries 27.3 



13.6 
12.3 
11.3 
15.4 
15.6 
15.4 
25.9 



11.4 
13.0 
12.3 
12.3 
13.2 
13.3 
13.7 
26.1 



12.5 
11.4 
11.7 

© 

23.2 



III-P 



TOTAL CANADIAN VACATION TRAVEL, BY LENGTH OF TRIP 
AND RESIDENCE AT TIME OF TRIP, 1966-74 



1966 



Average number of nights 
away on vacation trips 



1972 



1973 



1974 



Residence at time of trip: 

Total Canada 

Atlantic Provinces 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Manitoba 

Saskatchewan. . . . 

Alberta 

British Columbia . 



13.2 


12.8 


13.0 


12.8 


11.1 


12.6 


12.2 


12.8 


13.8 


13.4 


12.1 


12.9 


15.6 


15.4 


13.6 


12.8 


11.8 


12.9 


12.4 


12.7 


11.2 


14.2 


15.4 


12.7 



13.2 
12.2 
13.1 
13.1 

13.7 
12.6 
12.8 



98 



CANADIAN VACATION TRIPS TO THE UNITED STATES IN 1974 
BY LENGTH OF STAY 



III-Q 



CANADA 



TOTAL 
U.S. 



NEWENGLAND REGION 



Total Maine 



Massa- 
chu- 
setts 



All 
Other 



EASTERN GATEWAY 



Total 



New 
York 



GEORGE 
WASH 
New INGTON 
Jersey COUNTRY 



Nights spent in U.S. 

1 night 2% 2% 

2 nights 5 6 

3 nights 9 8 

4 nights 8 8 

5 nights 7 6 

6-8 nights 23 21 

9-1 1 nights 10 1 1 

12-17 nights 20 21 

18-23 nights 6 7 

24-45 nights 7 6 

46 nights and over 2 2 

Don't know/Can't remember 1 1 

Total 100 100 

Average number of nights 11.60 11.46 

(Base) 2,274 1,027 



2% 



3% 



4% 



4% 



5"i, 



5 


9 


1 


5 


9 


11 


* 


1 


13 


13 


13 


16 


15 


19 


* 


9 


11 


5 


9 


14 


5 


6 


1 


2 


9 


9 


8 


9 


6 


6 


8 


2 


30 


30 


30 


26 


21 


17 


32 


21 


9 


15 


8 


5 


12 


11 


19 


20 


14 


10 


19 


13 


20 


18 


25 


23 


3 


4 


3 


2 


4 


4 


14 


10 


4 


1 


8 


b 


1 


1 


1 


8 


* 


* 


1 


* 


* 


* 


1 


3 


1 


1 


* 


1 


2 


3 


* 


* 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


8.16 


7.54 


10.06 


7.69 


8.19 


7.68 


11.58 


13.93 


173 


76 


51 


73 


151 


123 


36 


57 





THE SOUTH 


GREAT 


OLD 
WEST 


FRON 




FAR WEST 




U.S. 




















U.S. 








All 
Other 


LAKES 


TIER 




Cali- 


Wash- 


All 
Other 


ISLANDS 


MAIN- 




Total 


Florida 


COUNTRY 


WEST 


Total 


for- 


ing- 


REGION 


LAND 
















nia 


ton 






Nights spent in U.S. 


























1 night 


* 


* 


♦ 


3% 


2% 


» 


3% 


1% 


6% 


* 


1% 


2% 


2 nights 


1 


1 


1 


11 


6 


7 


7 


3 


11 


4 


* 


6 


3 nights 


* 


* 


1 


9 


8 


2 


7 


2 


9 


7 


1 


8 


4 nights 


2 


• 


6 


16 


17 


14 


9 


5 


11 


8 


1 


8 


5 nights 


4 


1 


11 


12 


8 


" 


6 


3 


9 


6 


1 


7 


6-8 nights 


18 


17 


15 


14 


14 


7 


25 


15 


23 


34 


14 


22 


9-1 1 nights 


12 


14 


5 


12 


14 


21 


8 


9 


5 


12 


12 


11 


12-17 nights .... 


34 


36 


30 


10 


15 


19 


15 


26 


15 


15 


49 


19 


18-23 nights .... 


13 


14 


14 


6 


5 


10 


8 


17 


1 


5 


10 


7 


24-45 nights ... 


10 


12 


11 


5 


5 


14 


8 


13 


6 


3 


10 


6 


46 nights and 


























over 


6 


6 


6 


1 


1 


5 


2 


3 




1 


2 


2 


Don't know/ 




Can't remember. . 


1 


* 


I 


2 


6 


2 


3 


4 


4 


4 




2 


Total 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


Average 


























number of 


























nights 


17.49 


18.62 


17.27 


9.21 


9 33 


15 66 


11.60 


16 81 


8.23 


9.80 


1532 


11.26 


(Base) 


211 


167 


65 


127 


67 


45 


258 


109 


99 


103 


80 


955 



'Less than 1/2 of 1%. 
Note: The U.S. Mainland category is included so that comparisons can be made between 1973 and 1974 data 



99 



III-R 



CANADIAN VACATION TRIPS TO THE UNITED STATES IN 1974 
BY LENGTH TO STAY 



NEW ENGLAND REGION 



EASTERN GATEWAY 



CANADA 



TOTAL 
U.S. 



Total 



Massa- 
laine chu- 
setts 



All 
Other 



Total 



New 



New 



York Jersey 



GEORGE 
WASH- 
INGTON 
COUNTRY 



Nights spent in U.S. 

1-5 

6-11 

12-17 

18 and over . . . . 



31% 
33 
20 
15 



30% 
33 
21 
15 



41% 
38 
14 
6 



39% 
45 
11 
5 



31% 
37 
20 
12 



48% 
32 
14 
7 



40% 
34 
20 
6 



48% 
29 
18 
5 



9% 
51 
26 
14 



14% 
41 
23 
21 



Total 1 00 1 00 1 00 1 00 1 00 1 00 1 00 

(Base) 2,274 1,012 172 75 51 73 149 

Average number of nights 11.60 11.46 8.16 7.54 10.06 7.69 8.19 



100 100 100 

119 35 56 

7.68 11.58 13.93 





THE SOUTH 


GREAT 


OLD 

WEST 


FRON- 


FAR WEST 






U.S. 




















U.S. 




Total 


Florida 


All 
Other 


LAKES 
COUNTRY 


TIER 
WEST 


Total 


Cali- 
for- 
nia 


Wash- 
ing- 
ton 


All 
Other 


ISLANDS 
REGION 


MAIN- 
LAND 


Nights spent in U.S.: 


























1-5 


7% 
30 
34 
29 


2% 
31 
36 
31 


18% 
20 
31 
31 


52% 
26 
10 
12 


43% 

30 

16 

11 


23% 
27 
20 
30 


31% 
34 
16 
19 


14% 
25 
27 
34 


47% 
29 
16 
8 


26% 
48 
15 
10 


4% 
26 
48 
22 


32% 


6-11 


34 


12-17 


19 


18 and over 


15 


Total 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


100 


(Base) 


208 


116 


65 


124 


63 


44 


252 


103 


96 


99 


81 


940 


Average 


























number of 


























nights 


17.49 


18.62 


17.27 


9.21 


9.33 


15.66 


11.60 


16.81 


8.23 


9.80 


15.32 


11.26 



Note: Totals may not add to 100% due to rounding. 

The U.S. Mainland category is included so that comparisons can be made between 1973 and 1974 data. 



00 



ADDENDUM 



101 



CANADIAN FACTS CO. LIMITED 
TORONTO ONTARIO 



03 

[TO 



Study Z0118 
(9/12 WT) 



BASIC DATA--FILL IN AT THE END OF INTERVIEW AS INSTRUCTED 



CIRCLE: 

MR. /MISS/MRS. 



MAILING ADDRESS:. 
PHONE NO. : 



WRITE CLEARLY OR PRINT, GIVE INITIALS 

INTERVIEW NO. ON LOCATION NO. 

TOWN: 



NONE 



SEX: 



PROV . : 


(14/17) 


MALE 

FEMALE 


18-1 

2 



IF THIS HOUSEHOLD IS LOCATED IN A RURAL AREA (i.e., A COMMUNITY OF LESS THAN 1,000 
POPULATION OR OPEN COUNTRY) ASK: 



-a) Is there more than one acre in this property? 

-b) Last year, did you sell more than $50 worth 

of products grown or raised on this property? 

EITHER 



YES .. | Q ASK ^bT] NO ..19-1 
YES . 2 
NO .. 3 



IF INTERVIEWING MONDAY TO FRIDAY, SAY: 



B. 



We are interested in finding out how often people are at home on weekdays at about 
this time. We are not interested in Saturdays and Sundays, only weekdays . 



-a) 

-b) 
-c) 



Did you happen to be at home yesterday (or 
last preceding weekday) at about this time? 



(WRITE IN NAME OF DAY) 



How about 



How about 



(SAY AND WRITE IN WEEKDAY BEFORE) 



AT 
HOME 

20-Y . 
1 . 



NOT 
HOME 

. X .. 
. 2 .. 



CAN'T REMEMBER/ 

DON'T KNOW 



3 



(SAY AND WRITE IN WEEKDAY BEFORE) 
NOTE: WORK BACK THROUGH 3 PRECEDING WEEKDAYS 



OR 



IF INTERVIEWING SATURDAY, SAY INSTEAD: 



-a) 



-b) 



We are interested in finding out how often 
people are at home on Saturday at about this 
time. For instance, did you happen to be at 
home last Saturday at about this time? 



AT 
HOME 



NOT 
HOME 



CAN'T REMEMBER/ 
DON'T KNOW 



How about the Saturday before that, at about 
this time? 



1 2 



ASK EVERYONE 

C-a) TOTAL HOUSEHOLD MEMBERS 

How many people live in this household, including yourself, other members of your 
family and anyone else living as part of your household who is not a member of 
your immediate family? 

(a) (b) 

-b) How many are 18 years of age TOTAL NUMBER TOTAL NUMBER 
or over? IN HOUSEHOLD 18 AND OVER 



One . . 




21-1 


. 22-1 


Three 




2 

3 . . . 


2 
3 


Four . 




4 


4 


Five . 




5 


5 


Six 




6 


6 


Seven 
Eight 




7 

8 


7 
8 


Nine . 


9 


9 


Ten or 
NONE . 


More 









STUDY Z0118 



(cont'd) BASIC DATA—FILL IN AT THE END OF INTERVIEW AS INSTRUCTED 
D. FAMILY COMPOSITION 

-a) Are there any children under 18 years of age living at home? 

-b) (IF "YES") m m 

Are any of them under 5 years of age? 24-y .. X 

Are any of them 5 to 14 years of age? . . 1 

Are any of them 15 to 17 years of age? 2 .. 3 

-c) Total number of children under 18 living at home 25- 



ED 



YES 
NO 



23-1 ASK -b)~] 
2 



E. What is your marital status? Are you (READ LIST) 

Single? 26-Y 

Married? X 

Widow(er), Divorced, 

Separated? 



S. 



What is your position in this household? (READ LIST IF NECESSARY) 

Male Head 1 

Female Head 2 

Son 3 

Daughter 4 

Other Male 5 

Other Female 6 

What was the language you first spoke in childhood and still understand? 



English 27-1 

French-- (Quebec Interview) 2 

French--(Non-Quebec Interview). 3 
Other: (CIRCLE CODE & SPECIFY) 



H-a) What is your occupation? TYPE OF JOB: 



-b) 



J. 



TYPE OF COMPANY: 



28- 



Retired, Pensioned , 9 

Student, X 

Unemployed 

Homemaker Only, 8 



Homemaker employed outside home? . 

s that part-time □ (STATE JOB) 

or full-time? □ (STATE JOB) 

TYPE OF JOB: 



DAsk -b 



29- 



30- 



What is the occupation 
of the head of the 
house? 



TYPE OF COMPANY: 



31- 



Re tired. Pensioned, 9 

Student X 

Unemployed 

Homemaker Only? 8 



What was the name of the last 
school you attended? How far 
did you go? 



SOME 
Public/elementary school (Grades 

1 - 8--Quebec grades 1 - 7) 32-1 

Secondary/high school (Grades 9-13 

--Quebec grades 8-12) 3 



Technical/senior college (Above grades 
12 or 13--Quebec CEGEP/col lege 

classique) 

University 



GRADUATED 
2 
4 



No Formal schooling 9 

Refused 

Any additional schooling 



STUDY Z0118 



(cont'd) BASIC DATA-FILL IN AT THE END OF INTERVIEW AS INSTRUCTED 



m 



(HAND CARD 8) Would you mind 
telling me which letter on 
this card corresponds to your 
age group? 



INTERVIEWER: 
ESTIMATE EXACT AGE 



YEARS 



ASK EVERYONE 



a) 10 

b) 12 

c) 15 

d) 18 

e) 20 

f) 25 
9) 30 
h) 35 
i) 40 
J) 45 
k) 50 
1) 55 
m) 60 
n) 65 



to 11 
to 14 
to 17 
to 19 
to 24 
to 29 
to 34 
to 39 
to 44 
to 49 
to 54 
to 59 
to 64 
years 



years ... 

years . . . 

years . . . 

years . . . 

years . . . 

years . . . 

years . . . 

years . . . 

years . . . 

years . . . 

years ... 

years . . . 

years . . . 
and over 



33 


-1 


GO 




2 


TO 




3 


M 



4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

X 
Y 
34-1 
2 



CHECK TYPE OF DWELLING AND ASK: Do you own or rent your home? 



OWN . 
RENT 



36-Y 
X 



TYPE OF DWELLING (OBSERVE, DO NOT ASK) 

SINGLE OR SEMI-DETACHED HOUSE . 
ROW HOUSES 

DUPLEX, TRIPLEX, OR QUADRUPLEX 

SUITE OVER STORE, ETC 

APARTMENT (5-7 UNITS) 

APARTMENT (8 - 19 UNITS) 

APARTMENT (20 OR MORE UNITS) .. 

ROOM(S), PART OF HOME 

OTHER (CIRCLE CODE AND SPECIFY] 



STUDY Z0U8 



(cont'd)) BASIC DATA— FILL IN AT THE END OF INTERVIEW AS INSTRUCTED 



m 



N. TOTAL FAMILY INCOME 

(HAND CARD 9) In which of these 
letter groups does the approximate 
income of the family fall --that is, 
the income or earnings of all the 
family members living here added 
together? 



IF REFUSED OR DON'T KNOW 
GIVE BEST ESTIMATE 



(PER YEAR) 
TOTAL FAMILY INCOME 



REFUSED 



INCOME OF HEAD OF HOUSE 

(HAND CARD 10) Now in which of these 
letter groups does the approximate 
income of the head of the house fall? 



37-1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
D 



L, M OR N 38-1 



IF REFUSED OR DON'T KNOW 
GIVE BEST ESTIMATE 

$ (PER YEAR) 
HEAD OF HOUSE 



8 9 



REFUSED □ 



X Y 



AUTOMATIC CLASSIFICATION—OBSERVE, DO NOT ASK 



SOCIO-ECONOMIC LEVEL 



UPPER 39-9 



UPPER MIDDLE 
MIDDLE 



LOWER MIDDLE 
LOWER 



DAY OF INTERVIEW 

Monday 40-1 

Tuesday 2 

Wednesday 3 

Thursday 4 

Friday 5 

Saturday 6 

INTERVIEW NUMBER WITHIN HOUSEHOLD 

FIRST 41-1 



SECOND 

THIRD 

FOURTH 

FIFTH OR MORE. 

DATE: 



42- 



INTERVIEWER'S SIGNATURE: 



EMPLOYEE NUMBER: 







STUDY D1438 




ABOUT TRAVEL--ASK EVERYONE 18 YEARS OF AGE AND OVER 




SECTION SEVEN 


7-5 1 8-1 | 







1-a) Now for some questions on travel. Have you ever flown on a commercial airline? 

YES 9-1 

NO 



2 GO TO Q. 2-a) 



-b) Of all the trips you took by air during the past 12 months, if any how, many were 

primarily for business reasons, and how many were primarily for non-business reasons? 



NO. OF BUSINESS TRIPS 
(10/11) 



NONE . 00 



.NONE . 00 



NO. OF NON-BUSINESS TRIPS 
(12/13) 



2-a) Now, some questions on holidays, during which you might have travelled or stayed at 
home. Many people, of course, don't take a vacation for one reason or another, but 
I'd like you to tell me some things about any holidays or vacations you, yourself, may 
have had during a 12-month period--let 's say from November 1st last year to the end of 
October this year. Please do not count weekends or long weekends or statutory holidays. 

Did you, yourself, take any such vacations or holidays during the past year--that is, 
since a year ago October 31st? 



YES 



NO 



14-Y 



X GO TO Q. 2-c) 



■b) Were you away from home on a trip overnight or longer during that period? 

YES 

NO ! 



GO TO Q. 3 



-c) Have you taken a vacation trip away from home overnight or longer during the 
past 3 years? 











YES .... 


2 


GO TO Q. 14 












NO 


• Li 


MEN GO TO BASIC 
DATA. WOMEN GO 
TO NEXT SECTION 



597-433 O - 75 - 8 



STUDY D1438 
ABOUT TRAVEL-ASK EVERYONE 18 YEARS OF AGE OR OVER Q] 



SECTION SEVEN (cont'd.) 



3. 



Next, I'd like you to tell me more about the trips you took during your holidays, 
take the most recent trip first. 



Let's 



NOTE: EACH COLUMN REFERS TO ONE TRIP. ASK QUESTION 3 THROUGH TO QUESTION 12 FOR HOST 
RECENT TRIP FIRST . THEN REPEAT Q. 3 TO Q. 12 FOR EACH EARLIER VACATION TRIP UNTIL 
ALL SUCH TRIPS (UP TO A MAXIMUM OF 3) ARE RECORDED FOR THE LAST 12 MONTHS. 

Considering the total trip--that is, from the day you left home until the day you got 
back home--could you tell me all the places where you spent at least one night. That is 
in each province, each state, or in other countries. Please include the time you spent 
on the trip in your own province, and also the time you spent while you were at your 
destination. 

MOST RECENT NEXT MOST TRIP BEFORE 
PLACES SPENT AT LEAST ONE NIGHT VACATION TRIP RECENT THAT 



NEWFOUNDLAND 1 5- Y 

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND X 

NOVA SCOTIA 

NEW BRUNSWICK 1 

QUEBEC 2 

ONTARIO 3 

MANITOBA 4 

SASKATCHEWAN 5 

ALBERTA 6 

BRITISH COLUMBIA 7 

YUKON/N.W.T 8 

CONTINENTAL U.S.A. --INCLUDING ALASKA 
(SPECIFY STATES) 



26-Y 
X 

1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 



37-Y 
X 

1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 



16- 
17- 
18- 
19- 

20- 

HAWAII 21 -Y 

U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS X 

PUERTO RICO , 

OTHER CARIBBEAN 1 

BERMUDA 2 

UNITED KINGDOM 3 

FRANCE 4 

GERMANY 5 

SWITZERLAND 6 

NETHERLANDS/HOLLAND 7 

ITALY 8 

ALL OTHER EUROPEAN 9 

OTHER COUNTRIES (SPECIFY) 



27- 
28- 
29- 
30- 
31- 

32-Y 
X 

1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 



38- 
39- 
40- 
41- 
42- 

43-Y 
X 

1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 



4-a) 



■b) 



How many nights 1n total were you 
away from home on that trip? 

TOTAL NUMBER OF NIGHTS: 



(22/23) 



(33/34) 



(44/45) 



(IF VISITED BOTH THE UNITED STATES (INCLUDE HAWAII, U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS & PUERTO RICO) 
AND OTHER PLATeT OR PROVINCES IN 
Q. 3 ASK) How many of those nights 

did you spend 1n the United States 

Including Hawaii, U.S. Virgin Islands (24/25) (35/36) (46/47) 
and Puerto R1co? 



STUDY D1438 



SECTION SEVEN (cont'd) 



ABOUT TRAVEL—ASK EVERYONE 18 YEARS AND OVER 



ASK EVERYBODY 

5-a) As best as you can recall, could you 
tell me about how much was spent 
altogether by you and your party for 
that trip, including any credit card 
purchases or fares--in other words, 
the total cost of the trip. 



ABSOLUTELY CAN'T RECALL 



MOST RECENT 
VACATION TRIP 



(48/51) 
□ 



NEXT MOST 
RECENT 



l^L. 



8-1 



(9/12) 
□ 



TRIP BEFORE 
THAT 



(25/28) 
□ 



(IF VISITED BOTH THE UNITED STATES (INCLUDE HAWAII, U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS & PUERTO RICO) 

AND OTHER PLACES OR PROVINCES IN 

Q. 3 ASK) And about how much of 

that was spent in the United States, (including Hawaii, U.S. Virgin Islands & Puerto Rico), 

Please include any travel expenditures 

made in Canada to get there. 



ABSOLUTELY CAN'T RECALL 

(IF VISITED QUEBEC IN Q. 3, ASK:) 
While you were in Quebec, how many 
nights, if any, did you spend in 
each of the following areas: 

- Metropolitan Montreal? 

- Quebec City? 

- Any other part of Quebec Province? 



(52/55) 
□ 



[56/57) 



(58/59) 



(60/61 



Coul^ you tell me in which month you 
started that trip: 

November, 1973, 62-1 



December, 1973, . 
January, 1974, . . 
February, 1974, , 
March, 1974, ..., 
April , 1974, .... 

May, 1974 

June, 1974, 

July, 1974, 

August, 1974, ... 
September, 1974, 
October, 1974, . . 



Now would you tell me what was the main type 
of transportation you used on that trip? 

CAR 

PLANE 

TRAIN 

BUS 

BOAT 

MOTOR CAMPER 

OTHER 



:i3/i6] 
D. 



:i7/i8) 



(19/20) 



(21/22; 



.23-1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

X 
Y 



(29/32) 
□ 



(33/34) 



(35/36) 



(37/38) 



.39-1 
2 
3 

4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

X 
Y 



63-Y 

X 


24 


-Y 
X 


40-Y 
X 











1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


2 


3 


3 


3 


4 


4 


4 


(64/75) 







STUDY D1438 



SECTION SEVEN (cont'd) 



ABOUT TRAVEL— ASK EVERYONE 18 YEARS OF AGE AND OVER 



BO 



9. 



10-a) 



-b) 



11. 



12. 



13. 



14. 



(HAND CARD 6) 

Which of those descriptions best 
describe your reasons for taking this 
trip? Just read me the letters: you 
may want to give me two or three. 



MOST RECENT 
VACATION TRIP 



A .... 

B .... 

C .... 

D .... 

E .... 

F .... 

G .... 

H 

I .... 

J .... 

K 

OTHER 



41 -Y 

X 

1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 



NEXT MOST 
RECENT 



45-Y 
X 



TRIP BEFORE 
THAT 



49-Y 
X 

1 
2 
3 
4 
5 



How many people age 18 years or over were 
travelling together in your travel party, 
including yourself--that is, people 
travelling in your group only, but not 
the other members of a tour or charter, 
for instance? 



And how many of those 18 years and over 
were from your household, including 
yourself? 



Where was your home at the time of 
this trip? (CHECK BOX IF SAME 
COMMUNITY AS AT PRESENT, OTHERWISE 
WRITE IN NAME OF TOWN AND PROVINCE/ 
STATE OR OVERSEAS COUNTRY) 

SAME AS AT PRESENT 

OTHER 



Did you take any other trips during 
this 12-month period we have been 
talking about? 



(42) 



(46) 



(50) 



(43) 



□ 



(47) 



□ 



(5i: 



□ 



(TOWN/PROVINCE/COUNTRY) 
(44) (48) (52) 



YES 


.□go TO 


□ 


GO TO 


□ 


GO TO 




Q. 3 




Q. 3 




Q. 13 


NO . 


.□circle 


□ 


CIRCLE 


□ 


CIRCLE 




T 




'•2' 




'3' 




AFTER 




AFTER 




AFTER 




Q. 13 




0. 13 




Q. 13 




THEN 




THEN 




THEN 




GO TO 




GO TO 




GO TO 




Q. 14 




Q. 14 




Q. 14 



(ASK IF 'YES' TO Q. 12 AFTER THIRD TRIP) How many other vacation trips did you take in 
between last year and October 31st this year? 

(WRITE IN) 

(INTERVIEWER? CIRCLE TOTAL NUMBER OF VACATION TRIPS TAKEN:) 

123456789 OR MORE (SPECIFY) (53) 



On any of your vacation trips overnight or longer during the past 3 years , did 
visit: (READ) 



the continental United States? 



YES 



54-Y 



NO 



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CANADIAN FACTS CO. LIMITED 
TORONTO ONTARIO 



fTTI Study Z0118 

nm (9/12 wt) 

L§ = 2J (13 S.E.) 



SPECIAL SAMPLE 



BASIC DATA—FILL IN AT THE END OF INTERVIEW 

WRITE CLEARLY OR PRINT, GIVE INITIALS 



CIRCLE: 

MR. /MISS/MRS.. 



MAILING ADDRESS: 
PHONE NO.: 



NONF 



INTERVIEW NO. 
TOWN:. 



□ 



SEX: 



ON LOCATION NO.. 
PROV.: 



MALE 
FEMALE 



(14/17) 



18-1 
2 



A. IF THIS HOUSEHOLD IS LOCATED IN A RURAL AREA (i.e., A COMMUNITY OF LESS THAN 1,000 
POPULATION OR OPEN COUNTRY) ASK: 



-a) Is there more than one acre in this property? 

-b) Last year, did you sell more than $50 worth 

of products grown or raised on this property? 

EITHER 



YES .. 



DaSK -b) 



NO .. 19-1 
YES . 2 
NO .. 3 



IF INTERVIEWING MONDAY TO FRIDAY, SAY : 

i. We are interested in finding out how often people are at home on weekdays at about 
this time. We are not interested in Saturdays and Sundays, only weekdays. 

-a) Did you happen to be at home yesterday (or 
last preceding weekday) at about this time? 



(WRITE IN NAME OF DAY) 



How about 



How about- 



(SAY AND WRITE IN WEEKDAY BEFORE) 



(SAY AND WRITE IN WEEKDAY BEFORE) 
NOTE: WORK BACK THROUGH 3 PRECEDING WEEKDAYS 



AT 
HOME 


NOT 
HOME 


CAN 
DON 


T 
T 


REMEMBER/ 
KNOW 


20-Y .. 
1 .. 


.. X 
.. 2 







3 


4 .. 


.. 5 






6 



OR 



IF INTERVIEWING SATURDAY, SAY INSTEAD: 



-a) 



-b) 



We are interested in finding out how often 
people are at home on Saturday at about this 
time. For instance, did you happen to be at 
home last Saturday at about this time? 



AT 
HOME 



NOT 
HOME 



CAN'T REMEMBER/ 
DON'T KNOW 



How about the Saturday before that, at about 
this time? 



C-a) 



-b) 



TOTAL HOUSEHOLD MEMBERS 

How many people live in this household, including yourself, other members of your 
family and anyone else living as part of your household who is not a member of 
your immediate family? 



How many are 18 years 
or over? 

One . . 


of age 


TO" 

IN 


( 

rAL 

HOI 
21 


a) 

NUMBER 

SEHOLD 

-1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 


TO 
18 


rAL 
AN 

22 


(b) 

NUMBER 
D OVER 

-1 


Two . . 

Three 






2 

3 


Four . 






4 


Five . 
Six 






5 
6 


Seven 






7 


Eight 






8 


Nine . 


9 






9 


Ten or 


More 







NONE . 






X 



STUOY Z0118 



(cont'd) BASIC DATA— FILL IN AT THE END OF INTERVIEW 



m 



D. 



-a) 

-b) 



-c) 



FAMILY COMPOSITION 

Are there any children under 18 years of age living at home? YES 

(IF "YES") Y^ n_ 

Are any of them under 5 years of age? 24-y . . X 

Are any of them 5 to 14 years of age? .. 1 

Are any of them 15 to 17 years of age? 2 .. 3 

Total number of children under 18 living at home 25- 

What is your marital status? Are you (READ LIST) 

Single? 26-Y 

Married? X 

Widow(er), Divorced, 

Separated? 

What is your position in this household? (READ LIST IF NECESSARY) 



Male Head ... 
Female Head . 

Son 

Daughter 
Other Male .. 
Other Female 



23-1 ASK -b) 



What was the language you first spoke in childhood and still understand? 

English 27-1 

French-- (Quebec Interview).... 2 
French-- (Non-Quebec Interview. 3 
Other: (CIRCLE CODE & SPECIFY) 4 



H-a) What is your occupation? TYPE OF JOB: 



TYPE OF COMPANY:. 



28- 



I. 



Retired, Pensioned, 9 

Student , X 

Unempl oyed , 

Homemaker Only, 



Homemaker employed outside home? . 
Is that part-time, ED ( STATE JOB) . 

or full-time? □ (STATE JOB). 

TYPE OF JOB: 



DAsk -b 



29- 



30- 



What is the occupation 
of the head of the 
house? 



TYPE OF COMPANY: 



31- 



J. 



Retired, Pensioned, 9 

Student , X 

Unempl oyed , 

Homemaker Only? 8 



What was the name of the last 
school you attended? How far 
did you go? 



SOME 

Public/elementary school (Grades 
1 - 8--Quebec grades 1 - 7) 32-1 

Secondary/high school (Grades 9-13 
—Quebec grades 8-12) 3 



Technical /senior college (Above grades 
12 or 13— Quebec CEGEP/college 
classique) 

University 



GRADUATED 

2 

4 



No Formal schooling 9 

Refused 

Any additional schooling 



(cont'd) BASIC DATA— FILL IN AT THE END OF INTERVIEW 



STUDY Z0118 

m 



K. 



(HAND CARD 8) Would you mind 
telling me which letter on 
this card corresponds to your 
age group? 



INTERVIEWER: 
ESTIMATED EXACT AGE. 



.YEARS 



d) 
e) 
f) 

g) 
h) 
i) 

J) 
k) 

l) 

m) 
n) 



18 to 19 
20 to 24 
25 to 29 
30 to 34 
35 to 39 
40 to 44 
45 to 49 
50 to 54 
55 to 59 
60 to 64 
65 years 



years . . . 
years . . . 
years . . . 
years . . . 
years . . . 
years . . . 
years . . . 
years . . . 
years . . . 
years . . . 
and over 



33-4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

X 
Y 

34-1 
2 



L. Not Asked On This Version 



CHECK TYPE OF DWELLING AND ASK: Do you own or rent your home? 

OWN 36-Y 

RENT X 

TYPE OF DWELLING (OBSERVE, DO NOT ASK) 

SINGLE OR SEMI-DETACHED HOUSE 1 

ROW HOUSES 2 

DUPLEX, TRIPLEX, OR QUADRUPLEX 3 

SUITE OVER STORE , ETC 4 

APARTMENT (5 - 7 UNITS) 5 

APARTMENT (8 - 19 UNITS) 6 

APARTMENT (20 OR MORE UNITS) 7 

ROOM(S) , PART OF HOME 8 

OTHER (CIRCLE CODE AND SPECIFY) 9 



STUDY Z0118 



(cont'd) BASIC DATA— FILL IN AT THE END OF INTERVIEW 



m 



N. 



>> 

0. 



TOTAL FAMILY INCOME 

(HAND CARD 9) In which of these 
letter groups does the approximate 
income of the family fall --that is, 
the income or earnings of all the 
family members living here added 
together? 



IF REFUSED OR DON'T KNOW 
GIVE BEST ESTIMATE 



(PER YEAR) 
TOTAL FAMILY INCOME 



REFUSED 



.37-1 
2 
3 

. 4 

. 5 
6 
7 

• □ 



INCOME OF HEAD OF HOUSE 

(HAND CARD 10) Now in which of these 
letter groups does the approximate 
income of the head of the house fall? 



IF REFUSED OR DON'T KNOW 
GIVE BEST ESTIMATE 



(PER YEAR) 
HEAD OF HOUSE 



L, M OR N 38-1 

2 

P 3 

Q 4 

R 5 

S 6 

T 7 

U 8 

V 9 

W 

REFUSED □ 



AUTOMATIC CLASSIFICATION— OBSERVE, DO NOT ASK 



SOCIO-ECONOMIC LEVEL 

UPPER 39-9 

UPPER MIDDLE 8 

7 

6 
MIDDLE 5 

4 

LOWER MIDDLE \ 

LOWER 1 



DAY OF INTERVIEW 

Monday 40-1 

Tuesday 2 

Wednesday 3 

Thursday 4 

Fri day 5 

Saturday 6 

INTERVIEW NUMBER WITHIN HOUSEHOLD 

FIRST 41-1 

SECOND 2 

THIRD 3 

FOURTH 4 

FIFTH OR MORE 5 



8 9 



X Y 



DATE: 



INTERVIEWER'S SIGNATURE: 



EMPLOYEE NUMBER: 



STUDY D1438 



SPECIAL SAMPLE 



ABOUT TRAVEL--ASK EVERYONE 18 YEARS OF AGE AND OVER 



LTD L±E 



(9/13) 



QUESTION la and b NOT ASKED ON THIS VERSION 



Now, some questions on holidays, during which you night have travelled or stayed at home. Many people, of 
course, don't take a vacation for one reason or another, but I'd like you to tell me some things about any 
holidays or vacations you, yourself, may have had during a 12-month period--let 's say from November 1st last 
year to the end of October this year. Please do not count weekends or long weekends or statutory holidays, 
-a) Did you, yourself, take any such vacations or holidays during YES ... 14-Y 



the past year--that is, since a year ago October 31st? 



Were you away from home on a trip overn i ght or lo nger during 
that period? 



4-a) 



nn 



X_G0 TO BASIC DATA AND ASK ONLY 
THOSE QUESTIONS HARKED W1TH>> 



YES 

NO . 



1 GO TO BASIC DATA AND ASK ONLY 
n THOSE QUESTIONS MARKEO WITH>> 



Next, I'd like you to tell me more about the trips you took during your holidays. Let's take the most recent trip 

first. 

NOTE- EACH COLUMN REFERS TO ONE TRIP. ASK QUESTION 3 THROUGH TO QUESTION 12 FOR HOST RECENT TRIP FIPST , THEN REPEAT 

Q. 3 TO Q. 12 FOR EACH EARLIER VACATION TRIP UNTIL ALL_ SUCH TRIPS (UP TO A MAXIMUM OF 3) ARF RECORDED FOR THE 

LAST 12 MONTHS. 
Considering the total trip--that is, from the day you left home until the day you got back home--could you tell me 
all the places where you spent at least one night. That is in each province, each state, or in other countries. 
Please include the time you spent on the trip in your own province, and also the time you spent while you were at 
your destination. 

PLACES S PENT AT LEAST ONE NIGHT MOST RECENT NEXT MOST TRIP BEFORE 

VACATION TRIP RECENT THAT 



NEWFOUNDLAND 

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND 

NOVA SCOTIA 

NEW BRUNSWICK 

QUEBEC 

ONTARIO 

MANITOBA 

SASKATCHEWAN 

ALBERTA 

BRITISH COLUMBIA 
YUKON/N.W.T 



15-Y 
X 

1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 



26-Y 
X 

1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 



37-Y 
X 

1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 



CONTINENTAL U . S. A. --INCLUDING ALASKA (SPECIFY STATES) 
HAWAII 




















16- 
17- 
18- 
19- 
20- 
21 -Y 

X 




27- 
28- 
29- 
30- 
31- 
32-Y 

X 




38- 
39- 
40- 
41- 

42- 
43-Y 
X 

n 


U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS 


PUERTO RICO 





OTHER CARIBBEAN 

BERMUDA 

UNITED KINGDOM 

FRANCE 

GERMANY 

SWITZERLAND 

NETHERLANDS/HOLLAND 

ITALY 

ALL OTHER EUROPEAN 

OTHER COUNTRIES (Specify) 



IF NONE IN 
BOX VISITED 
GO TO Q. 12 



IF NONE IN 
BOX VISITED 
GO TO Q. 12 



IF NONE IN 
BOX VISITED 
GO TO Q. 12 



ASK QUESTIONS 4 TO 12 OF EACH TRIP TO CONTINENTAL U.S.A., HAWAII, U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS, PUERTO RICO. 



How many nights in total were you away from home 
on that trip? TQTAL NUHBER of NIGHTS: 

(IF VISITED BOTH THE UNITED STATES, (INCLUDE HAWAII, 
U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS AND PUERTO RICO) AND OTHER 
PLACES OR PROVINCES IN Q.3 ASK:) How many of those 
nights did you spend in the United States, including 
Hawaii, U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico? 



(22/23) 



(24/25) 



(33/34) 



(35/36) 



7447457" 



(46/47) 



SPECIAL SAMPLE (Cont'd.) 



ABOUT TRAVEL--ASK EVERYONE 18 YEARS AND OVER 



STUDY D1438 

[D GO 



MOST RECENT 
VACATION TRIP 



NEXT MOST 
RECENT 



TRIP BEFORE 
THAT 



(48/51) 
□ 



ASK EVERYBODY 

5-a) As best you can recall, could you 
tell me about how much was spent 
altogether by you and your party for 
that trip, including any credit card 
purchases or fares--in other words, 
the total cost of the trip? 



ABSOLUTELY CAN'T RECALL 

(IF VISITED BOTH THE UNITED STATES, 
(INCLUDE HAWAII, U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS 
AND PUERTO RICO) AND OTHER PLACES OR 
PROVINCES IN Q.3 ASK) And about how 
much of that was spent in the United 
States, including Hawaii, U.S. Virgin 
Islands and Puerto Rico? Please include 
any travel expenditures made in Canada 
to get there. 



ABSOLUTELY CAN'T RECALL 

QUESTION 6 NOT ASKED ON THIS VERSION 

Could you tell me in which month you 
started that trip: 

November, 1973, 62-1 

December, 1973, 2 

January, 1974, 3 

February, 1974, 4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 



X 

Y 



March, 1974, 

April, 1974, 

May, 1974, 

June, 1974, 

July, 1974 

August, 1974, 

September , 1 974 

October, 1974, 

Now would you tell me what was the main type 
of transportation you used on that trip? 

CAR 

PLANE 

TRAIN 

BUS 

BOAT 

MOTOR CAMPER 

OTHER 



. .63-Y 
X . 
. 

,. 1 .. 

. 2 . 

. 3 ... 

,. 4 ., 

(64/75) 



7-6 



8-2 



□ 



(25/28) 
□ 



(52/55) 


(13/16) 


(29/32) 


a 


a 


□ 


(56/61) 


(17/22) 


(33/38) 



23-1 


39-1 


2 


2 


3 


3 


4 


4 


5 


5 


fi 


6 


7 


7 


8 


8 


9 


9 








X 


X 


Y 


Y 


24-Y 


40-Y 


X 


X 








1 


1 


2 


2 


3 


3 


4 


4 



STUDY D1438 
SPECIAL SECTION (Cont'd.) ABOUT TRAVEL--ASK EVERYONE 18 YEARS OF AGE AND OVER GO 



(HAND CARD 6) Which of those descriptions MQST RECENT NEX T MOST 

best describe your reasons for taking this vflCATI0N TRIP REC ENT 

trip? Just read me the letters: you may 

want to give me two or three. 



A 

B .... 
C .... 

D .... 
E .... 

F 

G .... 

H 

I 

J .... 

K 

OTHER. 



41 



10-al 



How many people age 18 years or over were 
travelling together in your travel party, 
including yourself--that is, people 
travelling in your group only, hut not 
the other members of a tour or charter, _ 
for instance? 



-b) And how many of those 18 years and over 
were from your household, including 
yoursel f? 

11. Where was your home at the time of 
this trip? (CHECK BOX IF SAME 
COMMUNITY AS AT PRESENT, OTHERWISE 
WRITE IN NAME OF TOWN AND PROVINCE/ 
STATE OR OVERSEAS COUNTRY) 

SAME AS AT PRESENT 

OTHER 



12. 



Did you take any other trips during 
this 12-month period we have been 
talking about? 



45-Y 
X 

1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 



TRIP BEFORE 
THAT 



49-Y 
X 


1 

2 
3 

4 
5 
6 
7 



(42) 



(46) 



50) 



(43) 



(47) 



51 



□ 



□ 



□ 



(TOWN/PROVINCE/COUNTRY) 
(44) (48) (52) 



YES 


■ □ GO TO 


□ GO TO 


□ GO TO 




Q. 3 


Q. 3 


Q. 13 


NO . 


■ □ CIRCLE 


□ CIRCLE 


□ CIRCLE 




'1' 


'2' 


'3' 




AFTER 


AFTER 


AFTER 




Q. 13 


Q. 13 


Q. 13 




THEN 


THEN 


THEN 




GO TO 


GO TO 


GO TO 




Q. 14 


Q. 14 


Q. 14 



13. 



(ASK IF 'YES' TO Q. 12 AFTER THIRD TRIP) How many other vacation trips did you take in 
between last year and October 31st this year? 

(WRITE IN) 

(INTERVIEWER: CIRCLE TOTAL NUMBER OF VACATION TRIPS TAKEN:) 

1 23456789 OR MORE (SPECIFY) (53) 



IF U.S., HAWAII, VIRGIN ISLANDS OR PUERTO RICO NOT VISITED ON ANY TRIPS (IN Q.3) 
GO DIRECTLY TO BASIC DATA AND ASK ONLY THOSE QUESTIONS MARKED WITH » 



14. On any of your vacation trips overnight or longer during the past 3 years , did 
you visit: (READ) 



the continental United States? 
other provinces of Canada? .... 



YES 
54-Y 




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U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1975 O - 597-433 



Upsir 






OCTOBER 1975